euthyroid

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eu·thy·roid

 (yo͞o-thī′roid′)
adj.
Of or relating to euthyroidism.

euthyroid

(juːˈθaɪrɔɪd)
adj
having a thyroid gland that functions normally
Translations

euthyroid

a. eutiroideo-a, rel. a la función normal de la glándula tiroides.
References in periodicals archive ?
Euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS), also known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome or low triiodothyronine (T3) syndrome, is characterized by alterations in the levels of thyroid hormones due to non-thyroidal diseases in the absence of any disorder related to the hypothalamic-hypophysial axis or thyroid gland (1,2).
Euthyroid Sick Syndrome (ESS) is the term used to identify these abnormalities in thyroid function tests.2
Alterations in thyroid function in patients with systemic illness: the "euthyroid sick syndrome".
This low-T3 syndrome has commonly been interpreted by the medical community as a euthyroid sick syndrome, an adaptive compensatory and thus beneficial response that decreases energy consumption in diseased states.
A potential role of activated NF-Kappa B in the pathogenesis of euthyroid sick syndrome. Clin Invest.
Clinical review 86: Euthyroid sick syndrome: is it a misnomer?
A distinguishing characteristic of euthyroid sick syndrome, which is seen in clinically euthyroid patients suffering from nonthyroidal systemic illness is the presence of abnormal thyroid function tests.
Despite more than 3 decades of psychiatric interest in using [T.sub.3] in the treatment of depression and more recent enthusiasm for [T.sub.3] in treating primary hypothyroidism and the euthyroid sick syndrome, none of these applications is supported by reasonable clinical data--and in the case of euthyroid sick syndrome, there is a distinct potential for harm, according to the panelists.
Despite more than 3 decades of psychiatric interest in using T3 in the treatment of depression and more recent enthusiasm for T3 in treating primary hypothyroidism and the euthyroid sick syndrome, none of these applications is supported by reasonable clinical data--and in the case of euthyroid sick syndrome, there is a distinct potential for harm, the panelists said.
Euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS) was documented in 86 patients (17%).