Everich

Ev´er`ich


a.1.each one; every one; each of two. See Every.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Merly Mente, who works as a secretary at the Everich Knitting, said he heard explosions coming from the Perma Colour Inc.
Standing body height (BH) was measured without shoes to the nearest 0.5 cm with the help of height scale (floor type ZT-120 EVERICH, China) with the shoulders in relaxed position and arms hanging freely.
Chaucer writes that "God clepeth folke to him in sundry wise,/And everich hath of God a proper yifte" (God calls folks to him in various ways, and everyone has from God his own gift).
guests, receiving 'everich in his degree' (E 1017).
The Parson, who preaches a sermon in fulfillment of his commitment to tell a story, says that "a man and his wyf have three reasons to come together," one of which is "to yelden everich of hem to oother the dette of hire bodies; for neither of hem hath power of his owene body."[2] Continuing (and using a meaning of "chastitee" directly opposite in meaning to the Modern English descendant of the French-borrowed word), he praises the woman who, though she may not wish to do so, yields her body to her husband.
"Nece, I have so greta pyne For love, that everich other day I faste--" And gan his beste japes forth to caste, And made hire so to laughe at his folye, That she for laughter wende for to dye.
Al and Mary Helen Steinhauer, Jon and Barb Moulding, Paul and Ann Tuskes, and Rob and Heidi Everich offered various combinations of us a very needed respite from the mud, sweat, and biting flies.
When he remarks in the General Prologue that "Whoso shal telle a tale after a man, / He moot reherce as ny as evere he kan / Everich a word, if it be in his charge" (731-3), Chaucer both denies authorial responsibility for his characters and insists upon sustaining the integrity of each speech act he "witnesses." Every word--and every misstatement--indicates something important about the speaker, if his or her audience is clever enough to read between the lines.