Everliving

Ev`er`liv´ing


a.1.Living always; immoral; eternal; as, the everliving God.
2.Continual; incessant; unintermitted.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demanding of the heavens a clear mind and "thoughts and passions" as "everliving" as the stars, she muses on an unidentified female "Enthusiast":
for their mental, moral, and spiritual uplift" (in My Brother's Keeper, 103-4) and "to him, a priest of the eternal imagination, transmuting the daily bread of experience into the radiant body of everliving life" (A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man 252)
I stood before my favorite window (one that, for some reason, I consider Cistercian), and prayed the Phos hilaron: "O gracious Light, pure brightness of the everliving Father in heaven, O Jesus Christ, holy and blessed ..."
Nikki and Jack race to destroy the Everneath before the shackles on Nikki's wrists doom her irrevocably as an Everliving. This fast-paced conclusion to the series rewards fans with a not-so-fairytale ending.
Much of his religious language is vague, referring to divine laws, divine healing, divine inspiration, and the like, as in this "Daily Supply Prayer" from a 1941 publication: "OH FATHER, we desire to acknowledge Thee as the Almighty and Everliving Principle of Life.
"Everliving" tells the story of Ben Platt as he returns home to a small logging town.
The elves offer the closest thing to immortality that natural men can hope for; and the thought of this everliving memory might seem a comfort to anyone who had lost someone they loved, and had to live on without them.
being "Annah the Allmaziful, the Everliving, the Bringer of
Do you solemnly swear before the everliving God that the testimony you are about to give in this cause shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth?
approach and depart.' (72) The world is then seen as an everliving fire: 'This world-order ...
A century after Anaximander, the preSocratic philosopher Heraclitus similarly described the cosmos as that which presences in a manner that is logically prior to both men and the gods: he characterized it as "ah everliving fire, being kindled in measures and being put out in measures" (1987, 25).