reformism

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Related to Evolutionary socialism: reformist

re·form·ism

 (rĭ-fôr′mĭz′əm)
n.
A doctrine or movement of reform.

re·form′ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

reformism

(rɪˈfɔːmɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a doctrine or movement advocating reform, esp political or religious reform, rather than abolition
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a doctrine or movement advocating reform, esp political or religious reform, rather than abolition
reˈformist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

reformism

the doctrine or movement of reform whether it be social, moral, or of any other type. — reformist, n. — reformistic, adj.
See also: Politics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reformism - a doctrine of reform
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

reformism

nReformismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Evolutionary Socialism", the sixth chapter of the book, focuses on broader social, intellectual, and political currents which informed the reading of Darwin in Egypt through a number of thinkers, such as Farah Antun, Mustafa al-Mansuri, and Salama Musa who were less influential than other protagonists of the book, but who, nevertheless had a place in the making of the intellectual discourse.
Wells as a group promoting non-Marxist evolutionary socialism It is closely associated with the Labour Party.
Appended is an excerpt from Bernstein's Evolutionary Socialism, against which Luxemburg polemicizes.
Building upon critical studies and information about the reception of Bellamy's utopia abroad, it offers three approaches: a genre-based analysis of the utopian hybrid that suggests textual bases for multiple readings; a transnational history of evolutionary socialism that helps explain Bellamy's global relevance in the 1890s and again in the 1930s; and a comparative approach that contrasts the reception of Looking Backward in different national contexts.

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