Evenki

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E·ven·ki

 (ĭ-wĕng′kē, ĭ-vĕng′-) also E·wen·ki (ĭ-wĕng′kē)
n. pl. Evenki or E·ven·kis also Ewenki or E·wen·kis
1. A member of a people inhabiting a large area of eastern Siberia in Russia and northern Nei Monggol (Inner Mongolia) in China.
2. The Tungusic language of the Evenki. In both senses also called Tungus.

[Russian, Evenki people, from Evenki ə´wənkī.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Evenki

(əˈvɛŋkɪ)
npl Evenki
1. (Peoples) a Tungus people of E Siberia
2. (Languages) the language of this people
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

E•ven•ki

(ɪˈwɛŋ ki, ɪˈvɛŋ-)

n., pl. -kis, (esp. collectively) -ki for 1.
1. a member of a people of central and SE Siberia and adjacent parts of Mongolia and NE China.
2. the Tungusic language of the Evenki.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Evenki - a member of the people inhabiting an area of northern Mongolia and eastern Siberia
Oriental, oriental person - a member of an Oriental race; the term is regarded as offensive by Asians (especially by Asian Americans)
2.Evenki - the Tungusic language of the Evenki in eastern SiberiaEvenki - the Tungusic language of the Evenki in eastern Siberia
Tungusic language, Tungusic - a family of Altaic languages spoken in Mongolia and neighboring areas
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yao Yuqin, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Ewenki People and Television), Communication University of China Publishing House, 2009.
If a communications scholar wants to study how an oral culture skips developmental stages, in Marshall McLuhan's terms, (1) and fast-forwards to the age of electronic media in the wink of an eye, very few sites on earth can be more ideal than Ewenki society.
When the research was conducted in 2006 and 2007, several factors were bringing dramatic changes to Ewenki society: a government project to bring broadcasting coverage to every corner of the nation; a subsidy programme for ethnic groups with a population lower than 100,000; and urbanisation and ecological development projects in regions of Inner Mongolia threatened by deforestation.