expatriate

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ex·pa·tri·ate

 (ĕk-spā′trē-āt′)
v. ex·pa·tri·at·ed, ex·pa·tri·at·ing, ex·pa·tri·ates
v.tr.
1. To send into exile: They were expatriated because of their political beliefs.
2. To remove (oneself) from residence in one's native land.
v.intr.
1. To give up residence in one's homeland.
2. To renounce allegiance to one's homeland.
n. (-ĭt, -āt′)
1. One who has taken up residence in a foreign country.
2. One who has renounced one's native land.
adj. (-ĭt, -āt′)
Residing in a foreign country; expatriated: "She delighted in the bohemian freedom enjoyed by the expatriate artists, writers, and performers living in Rome" (Janet H. Murray).

[Medieval Latin expatriāre, expatriāt- : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin patria, native land (from patrius, paternal, from pater, father; see pəter- in Indo-European roots).]

ex·pa′tri·a′tion n.

expatriate

adj
1. (Sociology) resident in a foreign country
2. (Sociology) exiled or banished from one's native country: an expatriate American.
n
3. (Sociology) a person who lives in a foreign country
4. (Sociology) an exile; expatriate person
vb (tr)
5. (Sociology) to exile (oneself) from one's native country or cause (another) to go into exile
6. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to deprive (oneself or another) of citizenship
[C18: from Medieval Latin expatriāre, from Latin ex-1 + patria native land]
exˌpatriˈation n

ex•pa•tri•ate

(v. ɛksˈpeɪ triˌeɪt; esp. Brit. -ˈpæ tri-; adj., n. -ɪt, -ˌeɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing,
adj., n. v.t.
1. to banish; exile.
2. to withdraw (oneself) from residence in or allegiance to one's native country.
v.i.
3. to become an expatriate.
adj.
4. dwelling in a foreign land; exiled.
n.
5. an expatriated person.
[1760–70; ex-1 + Latin patri(a) native land (derivative of pater father) + -ate1]
ex•pa`tri•a′tion, n.

expatriate


Past participle: expatriated
Gerund: expatriating

Imperative
expatriate
expatriate
Present
I expatriate
you expatriate
he/she/it expatriates
we expatriate
you expatriate
they expatriate
Preterite
I expatriated
you expatriated
he/she/it expatriated
we expatriated
you expatriated
they expatriated
Present Continuous
I am expatriating
you are expatriating
he/she/it is expatriating
we are expatriating
you are expatriating
they are expatriating
Present Perfect
I have expatriated
you have expatriated
he/she/it has expatriated
we have expatriated
you have expatriated
they have expatriated
Past Continuous
I was expatriating
you were expatriating
he/she/it was expatriating
we were expatriating
you were expatriating
they were expatriating
Past Perfect
I had expatriated
you had expatriated
he/she/it had expatriated
we had expatriated
you had expatriated
they had expatriated
Future
I will expatriate
you will expatriate
he/she/it will expatriate
we will expatriate
you will expatriate
they will expatriate
Future Perfect
I will have expatriated
you will have expatriated
he/she/it will have expatriated
we will have expatriated
you will have expatriated
they will have expatriated
Future Continuous
I will be expatriating
you will be expatriating
he/she/it will be expatriating
we will be expatriating
you will be expatriating
they will be expatriating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been expatriating
you have been expatriating
he/she/it has been expatriating
we have been expatriating
you have been expatriating
they have been expatriating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been expatriating
you will have been expatriating
he/she/it will have been expatriating
we will have been expatriating
you will have been expatriating
they will have been expatriating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been expatriating
you had been expatriating
he/she/it had been expatriating
we had been expatriating
you had been expatriating
they had been expatriating
Conditional
I would expatriate
you would expatriate
he/she/it would expatriate
we would expatriate
you would expatriate
they would expatriate
Past Conditional
I would have expatriated
you would have expatriated
he/she/it would have expatriated
we would have expatriated
you would have expatriated
they would have expatriated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.expatriate - a person who is voluntarily absent from home or countryexpatriate - a person who is voluntarily absent from home or country; "American expatriates"
absentee - one that is absent or not in residence
refugee - an exile who flees for safety
remittance man - an exile living on money sent from home
Verb1.expatriate - expel from a country; "The poet was exiled because he signed a letter protesting the government's actions"
expel, kick out, throw out - force to leave or move out; "He was expelled from his native country"
repatriate - admit back into the country
2.expatriate - move away from one's native country and adopt a new residence abroad
emigrate - leave one's country of residence for a new one; "Many people had to emigrate during the Nazi period"

expatriate

noun
1. exile, refugee, emigrant, émigré, expat British expatriates in Spain
adjective
1. exiled, refugee, banished, emigrant, émigré, expat The military is preparing to evacuate women and children of expatriate families.

expatriate

verb
To force to leave a country or place by official decree:
noun
One forced to emigrate, usually for political reasons:
Translations
مَنْفي، مُبْعَد
emigrantudvandrer
pagulanevälja rändamavälja saatmaväljarännanu
ekspatriaattimaanpakolainenmaastamuuttaja
emigránskülföldön élõ
亡命去る国外追放国外追放者捨てる
ekspatriantas
ekspatrianta-, emigranta-ekspatriants, emigrants
vyhnanecvyhnanecký

expatriate

[eksˈpætrɪɪt]
A. Nexpatriado/a m/f
B. ADJexpatriado
C. VTdesterrar
to expatriate o.sexpatriarse

expatriate

[ɛksˈpætriət]
n (= person) → expatrié(e) m/f
adjexpatrié(e)
[ɛksˈpætrieɪt] vtexpatrier, exiler
They expatriated us to Siberia → Ils nous ont expatriés en Sibérie.

expatriate

nim Ausland Lebende(r) mf; British expatriatesim Ausland lebende Briten; the expatriates in Abu Dhabidie Ausländer in Abu Dhabi; I’m an expatriate tooich bin hier auch im Exil (hum)
adj person, familyim Ausland lebend; expatriate workersausländische Arbeitskräfte; expatriate communityAusländergemeinde f
vt personausbürgern, expatriieren (geh)

expatriate

[ɛksˈpætrɪˌeɪt]
1. nespatriato
2. adjespatriato/a
3. vtespatriare

expatriate

(eksˈpeitriət) , (eksˈpatriət) noun, adjective
(a person) living outside his own country.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Wing will receive the complaints of ex-patriate Pakistanis through post and even e-mail or fax and process the same within 24 hours.
Banco Halifax Hispania, the Spanish arm of the Halifax, said 500,000 British citizens own properties in Spain and demand for property within the ex-patriate areas of Costa Blanca, Costa Calida and Costa del Sol is still increasing.
Coundon Road was full with many ex-patriate Welshmen from local collieries roaring their team on.
"Everyone smoked his dope, drank his wine, listened to his records and saw the 16mm films he projected down his hallway." A British ex-patriate professor of film studies at the University of Western Ontario, Walsh was the first president of the Film Studies Association of Ontario (FSAC/ACEC's precursor) and an enthusiastic contributor to the original Take One, who really knew how to inspire affection for film.
The cultural anthropologist is a paradigmatic figure here, whose situation extends to psychoanalytic social critics like Walter Lippmann, racist demagogues like Lothrop Stoddard, rags-to-riches writers like AnzaYezierska, hard-boiled ex-patriate aesthetes like Ernest Hemingway, and the authors of those so-called "world texts," The Waste Land and Ulysses.
Ironically, like malay in his position, Anthony Bums ended his days as an ex-patriate in Canada, a fate that points to the tension, rather than the resolution, inherent in the tradition of seeing blackness as merely an abstract American figuration.
ex-patriate Americans he previously associated with such as Gertrude
The new position means traveling around the world for Banks, who is adjusting to life as "an ex-patriate," as she calls it.
Carl Sternheim and his wife Thea had been living in Belgium since 1912 and their house was a major meeting-place for the colony of ex-patriate German writers.
Having shared many of the author's home front experiences, I found that section of the book very readable (and memory-jogging) and any ex-patriate Brits or Canadians who were in Britain during the early forties would, I am sure, recall much of Ough's material.
Stein, only ten years Wharton's junior and, like her, an American ex-patriate who settled in France, identified her literary experimentation with the chaotic and violent changes wrought by the coming American century, and was always happy to be thought of as American insofar as "American" and "modern" were for her synonymous terms.