Exchequer bills

(Eng.) bills of money, or promissory bills, issued from the exchequer by authority of Parliament; a species of paper currency emitted under the authority of the government, and bearing interest.

See also: Exchequer

References in classic literature ?
He represented to the emperor "the low condition of his treasury; that he was forced to take up money at a great discount; that exchequer bills would not circulate under nine per cent.
In the first three years of the accounts (from June 27 1804 to April 20 1807), Malthus's investments in government securities were mainly in the form of Exchequer Bills.
of Transfers Yearly Amount ([pounds sterling]) 1810 2 240 1811 8 690 1812 8 550 1813 8 810 1814 6 540 1815 7 650 1816 7 660 1817 6 540 1818 7 730 1819 6 620 1820 8 710 1821 5 410 1822 5 560 1823 4 390 1824 7 700 1825 4 420 1826 4 270 1827 5 400 1828 5 340 1829 7 560 1830 4 330 1831 6 500 1832 3 230 1833 3 210 1834 2 170 137 12,030 Table III: Malthus's Purchase and Sale of Exchequer Bills, 1804-1807 Purchases Purchase Face Price (29) Value [pounds sterling] [pounds S D sterling] 1804 June 27 206.
by every possible means and in modes we had never adopted before; we took in stock on security, we purchased exchequer bills, we made advances on exchequer bills, we not only discounted outright, but we made advances on the deposit of bills of exchange to an immense amount, in short, by every possible means consistent with the safety of the Bank, and we were not on some cases over-nice.
He struck counterfeit guineas crowns and half-crowns, and developed a liquid that removed the denominations on Exchequer bills and then added his own amounts over the top.