excurse


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excurse

(ɛksˈkɜːs)
vb (intr)
1. to digress, to wander
2. to go on an excursion
References in periodicals archive ?
We see such "taunting" in Chapter 23 of Women in Love, Excurse, witnessing a violent argument between Ursula and Birkin.
His hope is to encourage people despite having a disability that excurse and eating healthy is possible without having to join a gym or hire a dietitian.
Young Eliot is festooned with infelicities in prose style: people in its pages are "bonding," students "gifted" Eliot with The Oxford Book of English Verse, Eliot becomes one of "the best networked younger figures in London literary publishing," "Tom and [Wyndham] Lewis decided to excurse to France together," and more.
Deborah Wong's important collection of essays Speak It Louder: Asian Americans Making Music is similarly filled with moments of marvelous recognition of incongruencies while also engaging in trenchant and critical analyses of various music-making practices of Asian Americans and the realms (physical, cultural, metaphorical) they excurse through in order to pursue their art.
For some readers this may come as a relief given how compulsory long definitional excurses on the term have become in scholarship in the field.
Brashier's desire to embrace four centuries of the Han dynasty, in addition to manifold excurses into preceding centuries, comes at a price of insufficient precision and of flattening complex historical processes.
17) Brief as it is, however, much of the poem is taken up with its "rather overgrown" poetological introduction, (18) internal excurses, and a closing myth.
We'll spare readers Derridean excurses on the quirk that reference to fleeing Lin Hui |e] ("grove return") gets followed by closural return to Han's opening paired tree motif
Excurses such as Burke's are predicated On nature as a kind of constancy.
According to Walter Benjamin in his excurses on dream kitsch, "No one dreams any longer of the Blue Flower [.
1) However, the sudden appearance of this vignette in a narrative that so largely consists of interjected memories and long excurses through Perrudja's readings suggests the recounting of a spontaneously retrieved memory, perhaps in a dream.