excurse

excurse

(ɛksˈkɜːs)
vb (intr)
1. to digress, to wander
2. to go on an excursion
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper we'll try to find out appropriate answers to the questions put by sharing a bit of historical excurse into the history of the East-West philosophy succession and correlation.
We see such "taunting" in Chapter 23 of Women in Love, Excurse, witnessing a violent argument between Ursula and Birkin.
The chapter entitled "Excurse" is perhaps the best example of how both Birkin and Ursula move toward each other, forsaking pure freedom on the one hand (which Birkin wants) and merging on the other hand (which Ursula wants).
His hope is to encourage people despite having a disability that excurse and eating healthy is possible without having to join a gym or hire a dietitian.
Young Eliot is festooned with infelicities in prose style: people in its pages are "bonding," students "gifted" Eliot with The Oxford Book of English Verse, Eliot becomes one of "the best networked younger figures in London literary publishing," "Tom and [Wyndham] Lewis decided to excurse to France together," and more.
The sex scene in 'Excurse,' between Ursula and Birkin, is described by Lawrence as "neither love nor passion." Rather, "[it] was the daughters of men coming back to the sons of God, the strange inhuman sons of God who are in the beginning" (WL 395).
In "Excurse," Lawrence attempts to emphasize the reunion of body and mind through the apparent paradoxes of "the deepest physical mind" and "pure mystic nodality of physical being" (WL 318, 319).
Deborah Wong's important collection of essays Speak It Louder: Asian Americans Making Music is similarly filled with moments of marvelous recognition of incongruencies while also engaging in trenchant and critical analyses of various music-making practices of Asian Americans and the realms (physical, cultural, metaphorical) they excurse through in order to pursue their art.
The "Excurse" episode opens with a startling simulation of colonial trespass.