Excusation

Ex`cu`sa´tion


n.1.Excuse; apology.
References in classic literature ?
Prefaces and passages, and excusations, and other speeches of reference to the person, are great wastes of time; and though they seem to proceed of modesty, they are bravery.
Philibert de Vienne's Le Philosophe de Court (1547; translated 1575) satirized courtly manners as "but too please and be gracious to others, whereby is obteyned honour and reputation" (201); "the semblances and the apparuances of all things cunningly couched, are the pryncipall supporters of our philosophie." Even Bacon commented that "excusation, cessions, modesty itself well-governed, are but arts of ostentation" (218).