exequy

exequy

1. a funeral procession or cortege.
2. funeral rites or ceremony.
See also: Burial
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And yet for all, this vnregarding soile Vnlac't the line of his desired life, Denying mayntenance for his deare releife: Carelesse ere to preuent his exequy, Scarce deigning to shut vp his dying eye.
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QUEZALES UNTIDILY ACHROMIC FLEABANE FERMENTS (81) HAPHAZARD AQUILEGIA SUCCORING TAEKWONDO (77) SCOFFLAWS HYPEREMIA AMATIVELY HALAZONES (77) HAMADA EXEQUY MIZUNA PLEACH YESSES (76) SNIPPER NONHOME EIDOLIC ESERINE ZONATED EMETINE RESECTS (75) HARIJAN ATOMIZE WASABIS EXIGENT DYNODES (74) PRELATE SEMILOG HEEZING ACTABLE WHIRLER SYNDETS (74) REPAST EXARCH DUNKER EVZONE FIESTA YAREST (73) The smallest size having a unique highest-scoring grid is 6x2; of the 72,093 6x2's, only one achieves the maximum score of 37.
In chapter 3, "Interpreting Emotions," Altieri shows how emotions engender storylines about identity-formation in Matthew Arnold's "Isolation: To Marguerite" and Henry King's "The Exequy," while in chapter 4, "Why Manner Matters," he shows how artistic style reveals the autonomy and value of affective experience in Giorgione's The Holy Family and in three poems by Robert Creeley.
With respect to King's "The Exequy," he writes, "in its interpretation of the elegy, King's poem is less interested in winning sympathy from an audience than in giving the audience the possibility of admiring what love can become" (98).
'Remember me' is almost certainly a translation of Pia's 'ricorditi di me', alluded to in 'The Fire Sermon' and quoted in the notes to The Waste Land, or of Arnaut's 'sovegna vos', quoted in 'Exequy' (1971: 101).
DM: I have heard you say that the 17th-century poem "An Exequy to His Matchless, Never-to-Be-Forgotten Friend" by Henry King is the best poem of grief in the English language.
Essays include: Kerrigan, William, "Introduction"; Seelig, Sharon Cadman, "'I fetch my life and being from men of royal siege': Ghostly Paradigms in Othello"; Sokol, B.J., "Text-in-History: The Tempest and New World Cultural Encounters"; Flynn, Dennis, "Donne, the Man, the Legend"; Henderson, Diane E., "King and No King: 'The Exequy' as an Antebellum Poem"; Tuck, Jonathan, "'Th ou Fall'st, My Tongue': Success and Failure in the Cary-Morison Ode"; O'Reilly, Mary Oates, "A New Song: Singing Space in Milton's Nativity Ode"; Hill, Eugene D., "Milton Borrows a Word: Or, Cherubim in the Midst"; Biester, James, "Wit's Post-Mortem: John Constable's Reflections upon Accuracy of Style"; Kerrigan, William, "Of Scorn."
He is best known for the poem "An Exequy to his Matchless Never to be Forgotten Friend."