exoskeleton

(redirected from Exoskeletons)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Exoskeletons: apodeme

ex·o·skel·e·ton

 (ĕk′sō-skĕl′ĭ-tn)
n.
A hard outer structure, such as the shell of an insect or crustacean, that provides protection or support for an organism.

ex′o·skel′e·tal (-ĭ-tl) adj.

exoskeleton

(ˌɛksəʊˈskɛlɪtən)
n
(Zoology) the protective or supporting structure covering the outside of the body of many animals, such as the thick cuticle of arthropods. Compare endoskeleton
ˌexoˈskeletal adj

ex•o•skel•e•ton

(ˌɛk soʊˈskɛl ɪ tn)

n.
an external covering or integument esp. when hard, as the shell of a crustacean (opposed to endoskeleton).
[1840–50]
ex`o•skel′e•tal, adj.

ex·o·skel·e·ton

(ĕk′sō-skĕl′ĭ-tn)
A hard, protective outer body covering of an animal, such as an insect, crustacean, or mollusk. The exoskeletons of insects and crustaceans are largely made of chitin. Compare endoskeleton.

exoskeleton

The hard outer covering of some animals, e.g. insects, crustaceans.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exoskeleton - the exterior protective or supporting structure or shell of many animals (especially invertebrates) including bony or horny parts such as nails or scales or hoofsexoskeleton - the exterior protective or supporting structure or shell of many animals (especially invertebrates) including bony or horny parts such as nails or scales or hoofs
plastron - (zoology) the part of a turtle's shell forming its underside
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
body covering - any covering for the body or a body part
skeletal system, systema skeletale, skeleton, frame - the hard structure (bones and cartilages) that provides a frame for the body of an animal
Translations
AußenskelettExoskelett

exoskeleton

nAußenskelett nt

exoskeleton

[ˌɛksəʊˈskɛlɪtn] nesoscheletro
References in periodicals archive ?
HUMEXE, as contrast to the rest of exoskeletons, bases the movement control of the lower limbs on the movement of the upper limbs of the individual, thus providing the user the full control of his movements, instead of being a control unit in control of the movements and their trajectories.
With robotic exoskeletons like ARKE, we have the potential to transform the future for mobility impaired patients by significantly improving rehabilitation stimulation.
Wearable Robots, Exoskeletons leverage better technology, they support high quality, lightweight materials and long life batteries.
This year, the program is moving on to powered exoskeletons.
A novel adaptive foot system to enhance the required stability of lower extremity exoskeletons as an add-on device was proposed by Jungwon Yoon et al.
I'm excited to lead a study of this scope to not only compile evidence for how these exoskeletons fit into the current continuum of care for SCI patients, but also could eventually improve quality of life with home use.
The approval classified exoskeletons as Class II devices.
The artificial muscles could be used as the "muscles" in medical devices that help people with impaired mobility, humanoid robots, exoskeletons and prosthetic limbs.
the robot follows the arm of the user without disturbing his/her natural motion), unpowered passive arm exoskeletons are less costly, safer, and more compact than the actuated upperlimb robots described and may be more appropriate during the return to function phase and for home use.
According to the BBC, the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit (Talos) would have a frame like that of exoskeletons that allow soldiers to carry large loads, but would also have layers of smart materials fitted with sensors to monitor body temperature, heart rate and hydration levels.
Not content to simply work around the problem with assistive devices such as exoskeletons, researchers are hot on the trail of actually treating paralysis using brain-machine interface devices.
Robotic exoskeletons have been the subject of wide-ranging research in the past decade.