exotericism


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exotericism

religious doctrines or practices that are easily understood by the general public. — exoteric, n., adj.
See also: Religion
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It is in these initial pages that Lampert recounts Strauss's discovery of exotericism, the doctrinal practice, supposedly held by ancient thinkers of composing a text with two audiences in mind.
Indeed, love can blind us to a fault, and in this case, the text apparently accepts Strauss's epistolary claims on the discovery of exotericism in an untroubled and, frankly, uncritical fashion.
For Strauss's critics, the argument over the exotericism thesis is difficult to merely circumvent.
Altman believes that Strauss himself practiced exotericism.
A post-Straussian (16) or pedagogical conception of exotericism will then be applied to Cicero in the second section: methods reminiscent of Strauss's will lead to conclusions quite the opposite of those he reached.
This purpose is analogous to a feature of Strauss's exotericism first noted by Robert McShea:
In summary: I propose to use Strauss's rediscovery of exotericism to establish an altruistic reading of Plato's Republic that mediates between his approach and the traditional reading where Socrates vindicates justice on the text's surface, which I will claim he deliberately does not.
Strauss may well have been right that post-revelation exotericism served to conceal what he calls "the evil teaching," (55) In any case, this is not my present concern.
Thanks to his mastery of pedagogical exotericism, Plato answers between the lines that any given philosophic reader's free choice to return to the Cave instantiates or rather imitates justice itself.
Despite his rediscovery of exotericism, (156) Strauss cannot even entertain this possibility because he is committed to the view that it is only the surface of the text that is edifying while the esoteric teaching necessarily consists of "basic truths which would not be pronounced in public by any decent man.
The author is distanced from the text and, by association, from their country; Leerssen argues: 'Nineteenth-century exotericism boils down to the paradoxical dissociation of the Irish author from his/her Irish subject-matter.
30) Rosen and Strauss are surely in agreement about the occasional need for philosophers to exercise caution in their public speech, (31) but in Rosen's understanding of the nature of philosophy, the fundamental, permanent Straussian reason for philosophic exotericism is missing.