learning curve

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learning curve

n.
1. A graph that depicts rate of learning, especially a graph of progress in the mastery of a skill against the time required for such mastery.
2. The rate at which something can be learned or the degree of difficulty in learning something: a product with a difficult learning curve.

learning curve

n
(Education) a graphical representation of progress in learning: I'm still only half way up the learning curve.

learn′ing curve`


n.
1. a graphic representation of progress in learning measured against the time required to achieve mastery.
2. the process of learning upon which such a representation is based.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.learning curve - a graph showing the rate of learning (especially a graph showing the amount recalled as a function of the number of attempts to recall)
graph, graphical record - a visual representation of the relations between certain quantities plotted with reference to a set of axes
References in periodicals archive ?
When later on this interpretation was applied to industrial products, Wright's "learning curve" equation became referred to as an "experience curve".
They said would use experience curve but about how to change on "We all have to get old some day and she deserved to be treated with care - but there was no care.
And it can't deliver the competitive advantage of the experience curve. This disregard of proven industrialization techniques devalues the basic currency of knowledge work: knowledge.
--Global Brand Strategy--is to increase profitability by reaping cost reductions resulting from standardization, experience curve effects and location economies.
We'd look to one of the later models, which benefit from the experience curve at Fiat's Frosinone factory.
Turn to the experience curve. This is a concept used by business economists to analyze the competitive position of key players in a given industry.
The goal is seeing future price parity on this experience curve for the power sector via levelized cost of energy that accounts for capital and variable costs common to the electricity industry.
The definition of the "experience curve" effect is also relevant.
Depending where individuals are on the experience curve, it may be that the time to normalcy is profoundly abbreviated.
The authors suggested that following their recommendation would lead to improved profitability: "The link between performance and relative market share, which is emphasized by the experience curve work, is supported by the findings of the PIMS database ..." (p.
The literature involving technology implementation abounds with explanations of decreasing per unit costs of production, hut a standard explanation for new technology innovation is the "learning curve" or as it is sometimes referred to "the experience curve." A rather standard assumption in much of the economic literature is the 85% rule (Thompson and Formby, 1993).