expressionism

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Related to Expressionists: Dadaists, Abstract expressionists

ex·pres·sion·ism

or Ex·pres·sion·ism  (ĭk-sprĕsh′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A movement in the arts during the early 1900s that emphasized distortion of external reality in order to express the artist's subjective experience.

ex·pres′sion·ist n.
ex·pres′sion·is′tic adj.
ex·pres′sion·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

expressionism

(ɪkˈsprɛʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Art Movements) (sometimes capital) an artistic and literary movement originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century, which sought to express emotions rather than to represent external reality: characterized by the use of symbolism and of exaggeration and distortion
exˈpressionist n, adj
exˌpressionˈistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ex•pres•sion•ism

(ɪkˈsprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n. (often cap.)
1. a style of art in which forms derived from nature are distorted and colors are intensified for expressive purposes.
2. a style in literature and theater depicting the subjective aspect of experience esp. by using symbolism and nonnaturalistic settings.
[1905–10; < German Expressionismus]
ex•pres′sion•ist, n., adj.
ex•pres`sion•is′tic, adj.
ex•pres`sion•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Expressionism

a movement in the 20th century that attempted to express feeling and emotion directly by distorting forms, choosing violent subject matter and harsh colors, and keeping the overall design out of balance. — Expressionist, n.Expressionistic, adj.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

expressionism

(c. 1905–25) An emphasis on pictorial distortion or chromatic exaggeration within any art of any period. The movement emphasizing heightened emotion and the artist’s subjective vision, and was characterized by bold brushwork and stylized forms. Influenced by Gauguin, van Gogh, Munch, and Fauvism, the movement includes the more specific groups of Die Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.expressionism - an art movement early in the 20th centuryexpressionism - an art movement early in the 20th century; the artist's subjective expression of inner experiences was emphasized; an inner feeling was expressed through a distorted rendition of reality
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
neoexpressionism - an art movement based on expressionism; developed in 1980s in Europe and United States; crudely drawn garish paintings
supra expressionism - a movement that tried to go beyond expressionism
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ekspresjonisme
expressionismo

expressionism

[eksˈpreʃənɪzəm] Nexpresionismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

expressionism

[ɪkˈsprɛʃənɪzəm] nexpressionnisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

expressionism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

expressionism

[ɪksˈprɛʃnɪzm] nespressionismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The generation of poets preceding the generation of expressionists had been gifted with strong imaginative personalities and illustrious translators (cf.
Did I fail to mention that Expressionists always paint self-portraits?
Once the textual expositions start, Krause investigates lesser-known Expressionists, such as Gottfried Kolwel, Arnolt Bronnen, Emmy Hennings, with prose as well as poetry in view.
* Abstract Expressionists concentrated on the actions involved in creating artworks rather than trying to produce images that people could recognize.
This video, from the publisher's American Painter Series, features the life and work of De Kooning, other abstract expressionists such as Pollock, Kline, and Gorky, and fellow members of the New York school of painting in the 1940s.
Murphy's point here is to separate the radical self-involvement of the expressionists from the quietist, affirmative hermeticism of modernism, but his arguments are episodic and lack the intellectual rigor he displays so admirably elsewhere.
The exhibition consists of 100 prints by artists including Pollock, de Kooning, Kline, Motherwell, Rothko, Still and Newman, along with members of the second generation of Abstract Expressionists like Helen Frankenthaler and Richard Diebenkorn.
Poland's Teatr Cogitatur offers up a dedication of its own in Paying Homage to Expressionists, written and directed by Witold lzdebski.
The Fuhrer made the speech at an exhibition of "degenerate" art at the Haus der Kunst in Munich which featured many of Beckmann's pictures, among those of other expressionists.
In his catalogue essay for the 1950 exhibition of Chaim Soutine's paintings at the Museum of Modern Art, Monroe Wheeler asked whether the artist "might be called an abstract expressionist?" The question was in part rhetorical: There had to have been enough apparent similarity--what art historians like to call "affinity"--between Soutine and the Abstract Expressionists to have made it seem natural to ask if he was a predecessor.
Nor does he point to the general confirmation of vitalism seen in Franz Blei's introduction to the apocryphal Das Evangelium des Apollonios, whose text is reproduced in full, where the Sermon on the Mount is spoken from the Cross, raising its significance in keeping with the use of it almost as a ecumenical link between many of the expressionists. The importance of the inclusion of such texts as Paul Claudel's Deux Cantiques in the original French, Italian poems in translation and a discussion of Dostoyevsky and panslavism that identify the arch-enemy as European capitalism and seek for a form of Orthodox Christianity as a shield against the cacophony of the modern world, should also be mentioned.
Dadaism subsequently subsumed a broad range of styles and media: Dadaists, Action painters, Abstract Expressionists, Pop artists, and New Wave filmmakers all showed a passion for commenting on the underlying social relations and on the cynicism, ennui, and disillusionment inherent in the struggle to relate ourselves to a world of unparalleled and unchecked technological advance and information explosion and a social order still buried in barbarism and discord.