radiotherapy

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Related to External beam radiotherapy: EBRT

ra·di·o·ther·a·py

 (rā′dē-ō-thĕr′ə-pē)
n. pl. ra·di·o·ther·a·pies
Treatment of disease with radiation, especially by selective irradiation with x-rays or other ionizing radiation and by ingestion of radioisotopes. Also called radiation therapy.

ra′di·o·ther′a·pist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

radiotherapy

(ˌreɪdɪəʊˈθɛrəpɪ)
n
(Medicine) the treatment of disease, esp cancer, by means of alpha or beta particles emitted from an implanted or ingested radioisotope, or by means of a beam of high-energy radiation. Compare chemotherapy
radiotherapeutic adj
ˌradioˌtheraˈpeutically adv
ˌradioˈtherapist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ra•di•o•ther•a•py

(ˌreɪ di oʊˈθɛr ə pi)

n.
the treatment of disease by means of x-rays or radioactive substances. Also called radiation therapy.
[1900–05]
ra`di•o•ther′a•pist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

radiotherapy

a method of treating diseases with x rays or the radiation from other radioactive substances. Also called actinotherapy. — radiotherapist, n.radiotherapeutic, adj.
See also: Radiation
the treatment of diseases, especially malignant cancer, with radium or other radioactive substances. Also called radium therapy.
See also: Medical Specialties, Remedies
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.radiotherapy - (medicine) the treatment of disease (especially cancer) by exposure to a radioactive substanceradiotherapy - (medicine) the treatment of disease (especially cancer) by exposure to a radioactive substance
therapy - (medicine) the act of caring for someone (as by medication or remedial training etc.); "the quarterback is undergoing treatment for a knee injury"; "he tried every treatment the doctors suggested"; "heat therapy gave the best relief"
phototherapy - the use of strong light to treat acne or hyperbilirubinemia of the newborn
Curietherapy, radium therapy - the use of radium in radiation therapy
X-ray therapy - the therapeutic use of X rays
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
العِلاج بالإشْعاع
radioterapie
radioterapi
geislameîferî
radioterapija
rádioliečba
ışın/şua tedavisiradyoterapi

radiotherapy

[ˌreɪdɪəʊˈθerəpɪ] Nradioterapia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

radiotherapy

[ˌreɪdiəʊˈθɛrəpi]
modif [treatment] → par radiothérapie; [unit] → de radiothérapieradio wave nonde f radio inv
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

radiotherapy

[ˌreɪdɪəʊˈθɛrəpɪ] nradioterapia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

radiotherapy

(reidiəuˈθerəpi) noun
the treatment of disease by X-rays and other forms of radiation.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

ra·di·o·ther·a·py

n. radioterapia, tratamiento de una enfermedad por medio de rayos-x o por otras sustancias radioactivas.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
LND: lymph node dissection; d/t: due to; EBRT: external beam radiotherapy; NED: no evidence of disease; FU: follow-up.
Local recurrence of prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy: early experience of salvage therapy using high-intensity focused ultrasoundography.
Ten years later, Nickel wrote an editorial in response to the study by Crook and colleagues on brachytherapy in Canada.[sup.2] According to Nickel, the authors did not compare these brachytherapy data with results obtained with conventional radical prostatectomy or modern external beam radiotherapy. The morbidity associated with brachytherapy is "disturbing" and Crook and colleagues could not "recommend brachytherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer on a solid "evidence-based" basis."[sup.2] Again, even with these significantly inferior results and high morbidity rates they did not abandon the procedure.
On the basis of the initial trial results, the Canadian Genitourinary Radiation Oncology group published two consensus statements on the use of postoperative adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy in the Canadian Urological Association Journal (CUAJ).[sup.9,10] With respect to the role of adjuvant radiotherapy, the consensus statement recommended that "consultation with a radiation oncologist early in the postoperative period is advised to discuss benefits and side effects of adjuvant radiotherapy in those with adverse pathological features at prostatectomy," and that "patients should be offered adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (within 6 months of surgery)."[sup.9,10]
Randomised trial of external beam radiotherapy alone or combined with high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for localised prostate cancer.
High-dose-rate intensity-modulated brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: California endocurietherapy's 10-year results.
LDR is most commonly used as monotherapy, whereas HDR is usually used in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT).
Prognostic significance of 5-year PSA value for predicting prostate cancer recurrence after brachytherapy alone and combined with hormonal therapy and/or external beam radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:753-8http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.08.049.
Metastasis after radical prostatectomy or external beam radiotherapy for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer: a comparison of clinical cohorts adjusted for case mix.
High-dose external beam radiotherapy was effective in controlling locally advanced, differentiated thyroid cancer in a retrospective study of 42 patients.

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