diegesis

(redirected from Extradiegetic)

di·e·ge·sis

 (dī′ə-jē′sĭs)
n. pl. di·e·ge·ses (-sēz)
1. The presentation of a narrative without direct dramatic imitation of the events, scenes, or characters described.
2. The world that is depicted in a work of narrative art, especially a film.

[Greek diēgēsis, narration, narrative, from diēgeisthai, to describe : dia-, dia- + hēgeisthai, to lead; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diegesis

(ˌdaɪiːˈdʒiːsɪs)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in narrative film or literature) the fictional setting, events, and characters
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

diegesis

- The narrative or plot.
See also related terms for narrative.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
diégèse
diegese
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, in the extradiegetic world, there are books about Harry, and there is probably not a single child who does not know his name, at least in English-speaking countries.
The topic is extended in the following chapter to an analysis of the text "Borges y yo," provocatively setting up an opposition between the "extradiegetic" and "homodiegetic author," that is to say, between Borges in real life and the author implied in his writings.
In analyzing several scenes from this film, Laine and Juva demonstrate that comedy often emerges from aural transgressions, mobilized through spatial effects (incongruities between sound and image, musical styles, and diegetic and extradiegetic space) and temporal effects (repetition and the manipulation of duration and rhythm).
(4) Is subject to extradiegetic verification, even more than historical fiction.
A sentence like "These representations of abject bodies appear to symbolize the rottenness of Ireland's social system to which the extradiegetic narrator repeatedly refers in polemic digression that mark a generic breach with novelistic discourse" (61) privileges jargon over clarity.
In the cafe scene of Jules et Jim, for instance, the presence of Shakespeare is repeatedly asserted but remains suspended in between intradiegetic and extradiegetic sound, floating across the boundaries between what the film characters can hear and what only we can hear.
The first is extradiegetic, when Kraus refers to the small party at the "Nembutal suicide of Danceteria emcee Haoui Montaug." (Acker wasn't involved; Madonna phoned in.) The second is boilerplate ("The city was reeling from the aids epidemic...).
Despite the designation of mother, which initially seems to mark Maria's existence, there is no description of her experience as a mother or of a mother--daughter bond, either from her perspective, for example in the pages of her diary, or from the perspective of the extradiegetic narrator.
Because this technique is linked to the confusion of narrative levels, I refer to the narratological definition of the concept given by the French theorist Gerard Genette: "any intrusion by the extradiegetic narrator or narratee into the diegetic universe (or by diegetic characters into a metadiegetic universe, etc.), or the inverse [...], produces an effect of strangeness that is either comical (when [...] it is presented in a joking tone) or fantastic.