diegesis

(redirected from Extradiegetic)

di·e·ge·sis

 (dī′ə-jē′sĭs)
n. pl. di·e·ge·ses (-sēz)
1. The presentation of a narrative without direct dramatic imitation of the events, scenes, or characters described.
2. The world that is depicted in a work of narrative art, especially a film.

[Greek diēgēsis, narration, narrative, from diēgeisthai, to describe : dia-, dia- + hēgeisthai, to lead; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]

diegesis

(ˌdaɪiːˈdʒiːsɪs)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in narrative film or literature) the fictional setting, events, and characters

diegesis

- The narrative or plot.
See also related terms for narrative.
Translations
diégèse
diegese
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the designation of mother, which initially seems to mark Maria's existence, there is no description of her experience as a mother or of a mother--daughter bond, either from her perspective, for example in the pages of her diary, or from the perspective of the extradiegetic narrator.
This sentence is ambiguous in mode between the colonel's free indirect discourse and the extradiegetic narrator's comment, an ambiguity generating a concordant effect.
In persona poems without voice, the level of the subject of enunciation can be more marked, sometimes to the point that the "person" of this extradiegetic speaker is formed on the extradiegetic level and that this speaker penetrates the lower diegetic level, that is the level of the plot (storyworld).
As an opening scene, it's an effective representation of the film that follows, which is defined both by its aloof cinematography--a consistently static camera, the absence of extradiegetic music --and by its protagonists' disintegrating relationship.
Das Echolot, a work that lacks an extradiegetic narrator and does not contain a single text by Kempowski himself (although it does include a photograph of him with other members of his family; in Januar 4: 445), tacitly asks its readers not to forget the war and the genocide of the European Jews, expecting them to draw all by themselves, after reading the compiled testimonies, an ethical lesson.
Thus, when Coverdale trips, a pivotal, extradiegetic moment occurs: Hawthorne's metaphorical mosses supervene on Coverdale's persistently allegorical and typological mode of interpretation.
In Narrative Discourse, Gerard Genette defines metalepsis as "any intrusion by the extradiegetic narrator or narratee into the diegetic universe (or by diegetic characters into a metadiegetic universe, etc.
This narrative voice obviously comes from Yan as the implied author and her narration forms the extradiegetic narrative level of the text.
The death of the ghost writer, indexed by the image of flying papers in the almost deserted and silent space of the London street that closes the film, accompanied by no extradiegetic score, with no melos to reinforce the drama, inevitably transmits a sense of emptiness and triviality.
This masculine coiffure enables her to appear unveiled amidst her diegesis and to gaze directly at her extradiegetic spectators (131).
The third-person narrator is extradiegetic, not speaking from within the world of the novel.