extradition

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ex·tra·di·tion

 (ĕk′strə-dĭsh′ən)
n.
The surrender of an individual by one nation or state to another nation or state where that individual is sought for trial or punishment for the commission of a crime.

[French : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin trāditiō, trāditiōn-, a handing over; see tradition.]

extradition

(ˌɛkstrəˈdɪʃən)
n
(Law) the surrender of an alleged offender or fugitive to the state in whose territory the alleged offence was committed
[C19: from French, from Latin trāditiō a handing over; see tradition]

ex•tra•di•tion

(ˌɛk strəˈdɪʃ ən)

n.
the surrender of an alleged fugitive from justice or criminal by one state, nation, or authority to another.
[1830–40; < French; see ex-1, tradition]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extradition - the surrender of an accused or convicted person by one state or country to another (usually under the provisions of a statute or treaty)
surrender - the delivery of a principal into lawful custody

extradition

noun deportation, expulsion, banishment, expatriation A New York court turned down the British Government's request for his extradition.

extradition

noun
Enforced removal from one's native country by official decree:
Translations
تَسْليم مُجْرِم
udlevering
luovutus
kiadatás
framsal
extradícia
iade etme

extradition

[ˌekstrəˈdɪʃən]
A. Nextradición f
B. CPD extradition agreement Nacuerdo m de extradición
extradition warrant Norden f de extradición

extradition

[ˌɛkstrəˈdɪʃən] nextradition fextra-marital extramarital [ˌɛkstrəˈmærɪtəl] adj [affair, relationship] → extraconjugal(e)extra-mural extramural [ˌɛkstrəˈmjʊərəl] adj [course] → hors faculté inv extra-mural departmentextra-mural department nentité f hors faculté

extradition

nAuslieferung f

extradition

:
extradition order
n (= request)Auslieferungsantrag m
extradition treaty
nAuslieferungsvertrag m
extradition warrant

extradition

[ˌɛkstrəˈdɪʃn] nestradizione f

extradite

(ˈekstrədait) verb
to give (someone) up to the police of another country (for a crime committed there).
ˌextraˈdition (-ˈdi-) noun
References in periodicals archive ?
at 668-70 (noting that precedent does not support notion that extradition treaty between United States and Mexico prohibits alternative means of retrieving an individual).
In mid-October, Irish fugitive Jimmy Smyth became the center of a landmark case testing a crucial amendment to the extradition treaty between the United States and Britain.
At the time, the extradition treaty between the United States and Britain applied only to common criminals and contained an exemption for political offenses.
The Court of Appeals (CA) has permanently stopped a Manila Court from compelling the Department of Justice (DOJ) to present proof that it has a valid extradition treaty with the United States government.
The council, which oversees Mexico's federal judges and tribunals, said the judge, who was not identified, had agreed that the legal requirements laid out in the extradition treaty between the two countries had been met.
It should be mentioned here that there is no extradition treaty between Pakistan and Britain.
Under an extradition treaty, the contracting state parties undertake to extradite or surrender to each other any person who is wanted for prosecution, imposition or enforcement of a criminal sentence in the Requesting State for an extraditable offense.
17( ANI ): Bangladesh Home Minister Mohiuddin Khan Alamgir on Sunday said that his country would hand over Indian extremists and criminals as agreed under the recently signed extradition treaty between the two neighbours.
The killers fled to Pakistan, while the Britain had no extradition treaty with Pakistan.
6) Alvarez-Machain challenged jurisdiction, asserting that he was illegally before the California court, but the Supreme Court held that absent explicit language in the extradition treaty between Mexico and the United States withdrawing jurisdiction resulting from transborder kidnapping, circumventing an extradition treaty does not itself violate the treaty.
The Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty (MLAT) signed by Philippines, Malaysia and other nations that belong to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) cannot be used as an instrument to substitute for the absent extradition treaty between the Philippines and Malaysia, said Ambassador Raul Hernandez, spokesman of Manila's foreign affairs department.