nectar

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nec·tar

 (nĕk′tər)
n.
1. A sweet liquid that many plants secrete from specialized structures, often inside flowers, where it serves to attract pollinators such as certain insects and birds. Bees use nectar to make honey.
2. Greek & Roman Mythology The drink of the gods.
3.
a. A beverage containing fruit juice or purée.
b. A delicious or invigorating drink.

[Latin, from Greek nektar, drink of the gods; see nek- in Indo-European roots.]

nec′tar·ous adj.

nectar

(ˈnɛktə)
n
1. (Botany) a sugary fluid produced in the nectaries of plants and collected by bees and other animals
2. (Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the drink of the gods. Compare ambrosia1
3. any delicious drink, esp a sweet one
4. something very pleasant or welcome: your words are nectar to me.
5. (Cookery) chiefly
a. the undiluted juice of a fruit
b. a mixture of fruit juices
[C16: via Latin from Greek néktar, perhaps nek- death (related to nekros corpse) + -tar, related to Sanskrit tarati he overcomes; compare Latin nex death and trans across]
nectareous, ˈnectarous adj

nec•tar

(ˈnɛk tər)

n.
1. the saccharine secretion of a plant, which attracts the insects or birds that pollinate the flower.
2. the juice of a fruit, esp. when not diluted, or a blend of fruit juices.
3. (in Greek myth) the life-giving drink of the gods.
4. any delicious drink.
[1545–55; < Latin < Greek néktar]
nec′tar•like`, adj.

nec·tar

(nĕk′tər)
A sweet liquid secreted by certain flowers that is consumed by pollinating insects and birds and is gathered by bees to make honey.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nectar - a sweet liquid secretion that is attractive to pollinatorsnectar - a sweet liquid secretion that is attractive to pollinators
secretion - a functionally specialized substance (especially one that is not a waste) released from a gland or cell
2.nectar - fruit juice especially when undiluted
fruit crush, fruit juice - drink produced by squeezing or crushing fruit
3.nectar - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the godsnectar - (classical mythology) the food and drink of the gods; mortals who ate it became immortal
dainty, goody, kickshaw, treat, delicacy - something considered choice to eat
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
Translations
رَحيقمَشْروب حُلو، شَراب الآلِهَه
nektar
nektarsaftevandgudedrik
linnunmaitomehumesinektari
nektárvirágmézistenek itala
gómsætur drykkurhunangslögur
nektaras
nektārs
nektár
bal özülezzetli içkinektar

nectar

[ˈnektəʳ] Nnéctar m

nectar

[ˈnɛktər] nnectar m

nectar

n (lit, fig)Nektar m

nectar

[ˈnɛktəʳ] nnettare m

nectar

(ˈnektə) noun
1. the sweet liquid collected by bees to make honey.
2. a delicious drink.
References in periodicals archive ?
Post fire resprouting of Banisteriopsis malifolia (Malpighiaceae) and the role of extrafloral nectaries on the associated ant fauna in a Brazilian Savanna.
Stipules usually represented by crater shaped glands or extrafloral nectaries.
But the extrafloral nectaries also enhance predation by internally feeding pod predators by protecting these herbivores against their natural enemies in areas where both ants and these herbivores are abundant; the resulting damage to seeds is substantial (Koptur and Lawton, 1988).
Observations conducted with starved wasps on freshly cut sprigs of nectar plants showed that foraging success was highest on extrafloral nectaries and flowers with exposed nectaries.
miniata (Germar) was observed feeding on extrafloral nectaries of Inga edulis Mart.
Extrafloral nectaries and plant guarding in Ipomoea pandurata (L.
leaf extrafloral nectaries enhance biological control of a key economic pest, Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in peach (Rosales: Rosaceae).
2001) observed 15 species of predaceous ants feeding on extrafloral nectaries of Heliconia, although they also harvested honeydew from scales (Coccidae) and mealybugs (Pseudococcidae) and thus may increase the populations of these pests.
The little fire ant has many traits shared with other highly successful and destructive invasive ant species, which include: 1) generalist feeding and nesting habits, 2) superficial nests in manmade and natural cavities not limited to underground, 3) high colony mobility, 4) polygyny (multiple queens in a colony), 5) colony budding, 6) low intraspecific aggression, 7) high interspecific aggression, 8) small physical size, and 9) tending of extrafloral nectaries and homopterans (Brandao & Paiva 1994; Passera 1994).
Extrafloral nectaries are plant glands occurring in nearly one-third of terrestrial plant taxa (Koptur 1992a; Rogers 1985), a useful food resource with ants, and often associated with these and other beneficial insects (Rogers 1985; Nuessley et al.
is similar to that found in Membracidae and extrafloral nectaries ant associations in the cerrado (e.