Extraprofessional

Ex`tra`pro`fes´sion`al


a.1.Foreign to a profession; not within the ordinary limits of professional duty or business.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lane's ostensible reason for constructing the men's afterwork lives is to ascertain how someone so terminally bored can have any sort of interior life, but his true motivation is to try to deny the prominent evidence that these men are no longer even men, not beings capable of any type of extraprofessional activity.
However, weak monitoring mechanisms in government have prompted proliferation of NGOs set up by social climbers and manipulators who, with little commitment to sustainable development or poverty alleviation, use their extraprofessional 'resources' to obtain projects from government.
Though professional activity is an important source of social capital, the analysis presented here was limited to extraprofessional relationships.
The husband alleged that he later discovered that the clinician maligned him while treating his wife, disclosed to her intimate details that the husband had disclosed to the clinician, and "engaged in an inappropriate and extraprofessional relationship" with his wife.
It helps economists to separate out professional arguments, which get classified as positive, from extraprofessional arguments, which get classified as normative.
The reason why it is useful to separate out professional from extraprofessional discourse is that there are and always have been substantial normative disagreements among economists over the issues of redistribution, desert, and the relative importance of liberty and economic welfare.
Accordingly, they should also find it useful to distinguish professional from extraprofessional issues.
For family physicians, extraprofessional social involvement with patients is more likely to occur.