fa

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fa

 (fä)
n. Music
The fourth tone of the diatonic scale in solfeggio.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin; see gamut.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fa

(fɑː)
n
(Music, other) music a variant spelling of fah

FA

abbreviation for
1. (Military) military field artillery
2. (Soccer) (in Britain) Football Association
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fa

(fɑ)

n.
the musical syllable used for the fourth tone of an ascending diatonic scale.
[1275–1325; Middle English; see gamut]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fa - the syllable naming the fourth (subdominant) note of the diatonic scale in solmization
solfa syllable - one of the names for notes of a musical scale in solmization
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

FA

N ABBR
1. (Brit) (Sport) =Football AssociationAFE f
FA CupCopa f de la FA
2. =Fanny Adams

fa

[fɑː] N (Mus) → fa m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fa

n (Mus) → Fa nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fa

[fɑː] n (Mus) → fa m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
69-74, a father (F) transferred a capital asset having a $20,000 adjusted basis and a $60,000 fair market value (FMV) to his son (S) in exchange for S's legally enforceable promise to pay F a $7,200 per year life annuity--in $600 equal monthly installments.
In this counter run play utilizing the boot-blocking scheme, the QB hands off to F as in the counter-trey, F sprints four steps to the outside, gives the ball to Z on a wide reverse, and continues on a fake run.
Purposeful revision can account for only a small number of the differences between Q and F, and if some recent articles on the problem are any indication of a trend, the case for editing Q and F as independent plays may already be dissolving.