feat

(redirected from FEATS)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms.

feat

achievement; exploit; courageous, daring act: an extraordinary feat
Not to be confused with:
feet – plural of foot: feet firmly planted on the ground

feat 1

 (fēt)
n.
1. An act or accomplishment of great courage, skill, or imagination; an achievement.
2. Obsolete A specialized skill; a knack.

[Middle English fet, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin factum, from neuter past participle of facere, to make, do; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: feat1, achievement, exploit, masterstroke
These nouns denote an extraordinary deed or action: feats of bravery; achievements of diplomacy; military exploits; a masterstroke of entrepreneurship.

feat 2

 (fēt)
adj. feat·er, feat·est Archaic
1. Adroit; dexterous.
2. Neat; trim.

[Middle English fet, suitable, from Old French fait, from Latin factus, done, made; see feature.]

feat′ly adv.

feat

(fiːt)
n
a remarkable, skilful, or daring action; exploit; achievement: feats of strength.
[C14: from Anglo-French fait, from Latin factum deed; see fact]

feat

(fiːt)
adj
1. another word for skilful
2. another word for neat1, suitable
[C14: from Old French fet, from Latin factus made, from facere to make]

feat1

(fit)

n.
a noteworthy or extraordinary act or achievement, usu. displaying boldness, skill, etc.: an athletic feat; a feat of heroism.
[1300–50; Middle English fet, fait < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin factum; see fact]

feat2

(fit)

adj. -er, -est. Archaic.
1. apt; skillful; dexterous.
2. suitable.
3. neat.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French fait made (to fit) < Latin factus, past participle of facere to make, do]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.feat - a notable achievementfeat - a notable achievement; "he performed a great feat"; "the book was her finest effort"
accomplishment, achievement - the action of accomplishing something
derring-do - brave and heroic feats
hit - (baseball) a successful stroke in an athletic contest (especially in baseball); "he came all the way around on Williams' hit"
rally, rallying - the feat of mustering strength for a renewed effort; "he singled to start a rally in the 9th inning"; "he feared the rallying of their troops for a counterattack"
stunt - a difficult or unusual or dangerous feat; usually done to gain attention
tour de force - a masterly or brilliant feat

feat

feat

noun
1. A great or heroic deed:
2. Something completed or attained successfully:
3. A clever, dexterous act:
Translations
مَفْخَرَه، عَمَل بُطولي، مأثَرَه
činvýkonkousek
præstationbedrift
saavutus
sasniegumsvarondarbs
skutok
junaško dejanjemojstrsko dejanje
cesaret ve ustalık isteyen bir iş

feat

[fiːt] Nhazaña f, proeza f

feat

[ˈfiːt] nexploit m, prouesse f
a brilliant feat of engineering (= process) → une formidable prouesse technologique (= thing created) → un chef d'œuvre de technologie

feat

nLeistung f; (heroic, courageous etc) → Heldentat f; (skilful) → Kunststück nt, → Meisterleistung f; a feat of courage/daringeine mutige/wagemutige Tat

feat

[fiːt] nimpresa, prodezza
a feat of engineering → un trionfo dell'ingegneria
that was quite a feat → è stata un'impresa non da poco

feat

(fiːt) noun
an impressive act or achievement. Building the pyramids was a brilliant feat of engineering.
References in classic literature ?
A MAN who had traveled in foreign lands boasted very much, on returning to his own country, of the many wonderful and heroic feats he had performed in the different places he had visited.
"But surely, my fair lord," said Alleyne, "you have done some great feats of arms since we left the Lady Loring."
But on that which was to follow, feats of archery, of bull-baiting, and other popular amusements, were to be practised, for the more immediate amusement of the populace.
"I have heard speak," said Porthos, "of a certain Milo of Crotona, who performed wonderful feats, such as binding his forehead with a cord and bursting it -- of killing an ox with a blow of his fist and carrying it home on his shoulders, et cetera.
So we see, in languages, the tongue is more pliant to all expressions and sounds, the joints are more supple, to all feats of activity and motions, in youth than afterwards.
His fame, as usual exaggerating his feats, spread ever more and more widely.
He had a practical mind and moved uneasily amid the abstract; but he found an unexpected fascination in listening to metaphysical disquisitions; they made him breathless; it was a little like watching a tight-rope dancer doing perilous feats over an abyss; but it was very exciting.
But Don Quixote, supported by his intrepid heart, leaped on Rocinante, and bracing his buckler on his arm, brought his pike to the slope, and said, "Friend Sancho, know that I by Heaven's will have been born in this our iron age to revive revive in it the age of gold, or the golden as it is called; I am he for whom perils, mighty achievements, and valiant deeds are reserved; I am, I say again, he who is to revive the Knights of the Round Table, the Twelve of France and the Nine Worthies; and he who is to consign to oblivion the Platirs, the Tablantes, the Olivantes and Tirantes, the Phoebuses and Belianises, with the whole herd of famous knights-errant of days gone by, performing in these in which I live such exploits, marvels, and feats of arms as shall obscure their brightest deeds.
They performed the dizziest feats of arithmetic, soaring quite out of MY feeble range, and perpetrated, in higher spirits than ever, geographical and historical jokes.
This encounter, together with my set-to with the Martian warrior on the previous day and my feats of jumping placed me upon a high pinnacle in their regard.
'elucidate the diverting accomplishments of his highly trained performing dog Merrylegs.' He was also to exhibit 'his astounding feat of throwing seventy-five hundred-weight in rapid succession backhanded over his head, thus forming a fountain of solid iron in mid-air, a feat never before attempted in this or any other country, and which having elicited such rapturous plaudits from enthusiastic throngs it cannot be withdrawn.' The same Signor Jupe was to 'enliven the varied performances at frequent intervals with his chaste Shaksperean quips and retorts.' Lastly, he was to wind them up by appearing in his favourite character of Mr.
(This was the attack for which Ermolov claimed the credit, declaring that only his courage and good luck made such a feat possible: it was the attack in which he was said to have thrown some St.