functional food

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functional food

functional food

n
(Cookery) a food containing additives which provide extra nutritional value. Also called: nutraceutical

func′tional food`


n.
[1985–90]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
FOSHU are products officially approved to claim their physiological effects, and it is under an individual approval system.
Products using the ingredients are being widely sold in Japan, but without the on-label health claims and without the formal FOSHU logo confirming MHLW acceptance of the products.
This unexciting "non-claim" was allowed before the current FOSHU era, at a time when MHLW did not allow any health claims to be used on- or off-label for non-drug foods and beverages.
A consortium of Japanese food, beverage and pharmaceutical companies, along with at least two universities and two large trading companies, have been working on providing scientific support for a new "antifatigue" FOSHU category.
Unofficial but consistent reports from ifia Japan 2007 exhibitors indicated that the expected fall 2007 formal adoption of a FOSHU Anti-Fatigue Category has been delayed by MHLW.
The most helpful incentive will be a public statement by the MHLW encouraging the development of an eye health FOSHU category, similar to the approach currently being taken in establishing a formal Anti-Fatigue FOSHU category.
Japan remains the biggest nutraceutical market, and its FOSHU (Foods For Specified Health Issues) regulatory laws are very strict.
The Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare assesses the quality of products and only issues the FOSHU seal of approval if they meet its stringent standards.
Since 2001, companies making specific health claims about drinks have to get approval from the ministry of health, labour and welfare's 'Tokuho' department--or FOSHU (foods for specific health uses), to use its English language acronym.
The regulatory situation is also key to the development of the heart benefit foods market, with the use of approved health claims increasing consumer confidence and allowing the market to develop along more clearly defined lines, as the FOSHU system has done in Japan.