Fabian Society

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Related to Fabian socialism: George Bernard Shaw

Fabian Society

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an association of British socialists advocating the establishment of democratic socialism by gradual reforms within the law: founded in 1884
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Fa′bian Soci`ety


n.
an organization founded in England in 1884 to spread socialist principles gradually by peaceful means.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fabian Society - an association of British socialists who advocate gradual reforms within the law leading to democratic socialism
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
Fabian - a member of the Fabian Society in Britain
First Baron Passfield, Sidney James Webb, Sidney Webb, Webb - English sociologist and economist and a central member of the Fabian Society (1859-1947)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then there was Gandhi's idea of a village-based, anti-industrial society and Patel's idea that preferred market capitalism to Nehru's Fabian socialism.
While Jawaharlal Nehru's Fabian socialism can be discarded, his secularism has to be preserved and nurtured.
In this country One Nation Toryism, Gladstonian Liberalism and Fabian socialism were equally hostile to vice and each of them reckoned its causes in social conditions rather than the disordered desires of individuals.
So-called "Fabian socialism," or socialist incrementalism, had been devised by British intellectuals in the late 19th century.
and granting massive new entitlements" associated with "Nehru's turn to Fabian Socialism" in India's post-Independence era (Dalmia, 2014: 1-2).
It was not the National Socialists or any individual Nazi who first talked about gassing undesirables - it was that scion of the British Labour movement and Fabian socialism, George Bernard Shaw.
The country had followed Fabian socialism and even proclaimed that it would create a "socialistic pattern of society".
Chesterton was at first influenced by Belloc's ideas, but the mutual admiration eventually developed into a friendship and life-long intellectual cooperation which George Bernard Shaw saw as a "most dangerous conspiracy," a quadrupedal chimera he named "Chester-Belloc" This fire-breathing monster with a lion's head attacked many fads and misconceptions, including Shaw's progressive Fabian socialism and evolutionism as well as H.
Cudjoe attributes this partially to Fabian socialism, absorbed during Webber's travels in England.
But she converted to gradualist Fabian socialism and was a key figure, according to Nasar, in convincing Winston Churchill and other British leaders to adopt the welfare state in Britain.
The welfare state, along with the nationalised industries, was born out of Liberalism and that peculiarly genteel British form of Stalinism called Fabian Socialism. But like its more violent Russian counterpart, it was really a kind of bureaucratic collectivism and the main objective was the promotion of industrialisation.
(Nonetheless, one worries that Wallace has given it too much credence herself.) Lastly, Lyubov Bugaeva's 'Education and Social Change: Gorky, Dewey and Fabian Socialism' is an interesting historical piece on Maxim Gorky's search for a philosophy of revolutionary consciousness.