Fabian Society

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Fabian Society

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an association of British socialists advocating the establishment of democratic socialism by gradual reforms within the law: founded in 1884
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Fa′bian Soci`ety


n.
an organization founded in England in 1884 to spread socialist principles gradually by peaceful means.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fabian Society - an association of British socialists who advocate gradual reforms within the law leading to democratic socialism
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
Fabian - a member of the Fabian Society in Britain
First Baron Passfield, Sidney James Webb, Sidney Webb, Webb - English sociologist and economist and a central member of the Fabian Society (1859-1947)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Oh-so "progressive": Fabian Socialist icon George Bernard Shaw, literary giant and intellectual guru of the Left, publicly praised Hitler, Mussolini, Lenin, and Stalin--and was a virulent anti-Semite, viewing Jews as the "real enemy."
William Clarke, a journalist and Fabian socialist, published his book Walt Whitman (1892) with Swan Sonnenschein, Edward Carpenter's publisher.
In a similar vein, the press in India is starting to wonder if the economic miracle is returning to the more anemic 'Hindu rate of growth' which Das (2006:2) explains, "had nothing to do with Hinduism and everything to do with the Fabian socialist policies of Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru".
/ Beat enters system; // re-enters blood stream." On occasion Goodison strays into a flat didacticism: "Norman Manley, Fabian socialist // who'd appealed to the conscience of the United / Fruit Company to donate a fraction of one percent / of a year's profits to the welfare of our peasants." But more typically her language--luminous, generous, and clarifying--elicits admiration.
Previous Theatre Notebook publications include "The Other Percy Nash: Theatrical Interludes in the Life of a Film Pioneer" (64.1, 2010: 28-48), "An Early Pioneer of the New Drama: Charles Charrington, Actor-Manager and Fabian Socialist" (64.3, 2010: 130-59), "Redefining the Grotesque: E.
Elsewhere, Beck, who in the past has essentially said that the Jews killed Jesus, says, with his trademark more-sorrow-than-anger stare of faux-anguish, "His mother was a strong anti-Semitehis words, not mine"; reports that Soros said he felt no guilt at having to aid in the confiscation of his fellow Hungarian Jews' land before World War II; and he describes Soros' ultimate goal as "one global society, one global gatekeeper." He describes Soros' alma mater, the London School of Economics, as "Fabian Socialist" (which may help explain the behavior of fellow-alum Mick Jagger).
In 1913 Beatrice Webb, the Fabian socialist, sensed a wider women's movement allied with international labour and subject peoples on the brink of a new democracy.
A minority of Commissioners, led by Fabian socialist Beatrice Webb and Lansbury, rejected the traditional Poor Law philosophy that a person's destitution stemmed from their own moral character failing and that deterrence and punishment should be central features of poor relief.
Leave it to the Fabian socialist to begin his playwriting career by spinning a youthful romance into an expose of slumlord operations.
(8) In the Fabian socialist future the needs of the social organism would determine an increasing differentiation of labour.
Leonard Woolf, "a dark star," likewise lived longer than the love of his life, Virginia--three decades longer, during which he wrote five volumes of astonishing autobiography, the Pilgrim's Progress of a Jewish outsider at Cambridge early in the century, a disenchanted servant of the British Empire in Ceylon before the First World War, a Fabian Socialist (buddy of the Webbs), a highbrow publisher (of T.
He was a dedicated Fabian Socialist and friend to the downtrodden, as made plain in his brilliant ethnography, co-authored with Peter Willmott, Family and Kinship in East London (1957), who began a School for Social Entrepreneurs.