Fabius Maximus


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Related to Fabius Maximus: cunctator, Cato the Elder, Scipio Aemilianus

Fabius Maximus

(ˈfeɪbɪəs ˈmæksɪməs)
n
(Biography) full name Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus, called Cunctator (the delayer). died 203 bc, Roman general and statesman. As commander of the Roman army during the Second Punic War, he withstood Hannibal by his strategy of harassing the Carthaginians while avoiding a pitched battle

Fa•bi•us Max•i•mus

(ˈfeɪ bi əs ˈmæk sə məs)
n.
(Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus) (“Cunctator”) 275–203 B.C., Roman general.
References in classic literature ?
For this he was upbraided in the Senate by Fabius Maximus, and called the corrupter of the Roman soldiery.
A Fabia Majestica B Fabium Imperia C Fabius Maximus D Fabias Regalis 9.
A Fabia Majestica B Fabium Imperia C Fabius Maximus D Fabias Regalis A Cast B Oasis C Ocean Colour Scene D Blur 15.
Passing allusions to Fabian thinking (48-50, for instance), referring to Roman general Quintus Fabius Maximus (280-203 BC), "the Delayer" who tried to exhaust rather than fight the forces of Hannibal during the Second Punic War, imply that Washington held to the same strategic persuasion in ultimately defeating the martial forces of Great Britain.
The Court's strategy this time--the same strategy as that of gay-rights advocates--is borrowed from the Roman dictator and general Fabius Maximus. In the Second Punic War, Fabius knew that, if he directly confronted Hannibal, who had crossed the Alps and was invading Italy, he would lose.
Here Ovid praises his addressee Fabius Maximus: Hercules was the legendary ancestor of the Fabii (cf.
Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus Cunctator, known to modernity simply as Fabius, served as a Roman general during the second century BC.
The Second Punic War produced its share of Roman leaders--among them Fabius Maximus, whose careful delaying tactics kept Hannibal at bay where direct confrontation could not, and Marcus Claudius Marcellus, whose forces took Syracuse.
As a commander in the war and as doge of Venice after 1523, Andrea Gritti was the foremost proponent of this strategy, earning for himself the appellation of "Fabius Maximus," the Roman general who opposed Hannibal by delay and defense in the Second Punic War.
Similarly the author does not discuss the differences between the three redactions of the Cortegiano, nor why Castiglione superimposes certain contemporary characters on classical ones: for example, duke Guidubaldo on Fabius Maximus. He does, however, cogently analyse the parallels between Castiglione and Cicero from the points of view of imitatio and variatio in the use of facetiae.