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Facebook

(ˈfeɪsˌbʊk)
n
(Communications & Information) a popular social networking website
vb
1. (Communications & Information) (tr; sometimes not capital) to search for (a person's profile) on the Facebook website
2. (Communications & Information) (intr; sometimes not capital) to use the Facebook website
ˈFaceˌbooker n
Translations
facebooker
References in periodicals archive ?
Nomophobia, phantom vibration syndrome, screen insomnia, smartphone addiction, information overload, facebook fatigue, selfitis (the compulsive need to post selfies), social media distraction and the rest are all covered by the umbrella of "technostress."
Some analysts have expressed fears that young people are succumbing to "Facebook fatigue" and scaling back use, if not dropping out all together.
Apparently they are suffering from 'Facebook Fatigue', a term coined by investors to describe mounting anecdotal evidence that youngsters are leaving the social media site.
Melbourne, April 28 ( ANI ): 'Facebook fatigue' has reached Australia, as new data revealed that almost 400,000 users have drifted away from the social network since December.
The oft used term of "Facebook fatigue" could again be in focus, since Facebook will pretty much be everywhere on your phone.
Commentators have recently suggested that the loss could be caused by 'Facebook fatigue' as continuous concerns over data ownership, privacy and invasive advertising dog the business as it tries to monetise and add value.
But while Facebook may now seem a nearly ubiquitous part of modern life, there are signs that Facebook fatigue may be setting in, at least in the U.S.
"Facebook continuously has the challenge of Facebook fatigue, of the novelty factor wearing off, and therefore they have to introduce new kinds of interaction," he told Reuters.
"Facebook continuously has the challenge of Facebook fatigue, of the novelty factor wearing off, and therefore they have to introduce new kinds of interaction," said Valdes, citing new features such as the "Timeline" interface and the planned $1 billion acquisition of mobile photo-sharing app Instagram.
They are looking for signs of what has come to be called "Facebook fatigue," as they try to determine whether the company should be valued as high as $100 billion when its stock begins to trade later this year.
Pew noticed little evidence of Facebook fatigue: The more time that had passed since first using Facebook, the more frequently a user would make status updates, like and comment on friends'posts, and tag friends in photos.