Fads


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Fads

See also manias.

excessive concern with matters of dress; foppishness. — dandy, n.
a wild enthusiast; a faddist. See also demons.
an inclination for adopting fads. — faddishness, faddist, n. — faddish, adj.
a manifestation of intense enthusiasm for something; craze or fad, as musicomania.
References in classic literature ?
Esther is really a dear girl, but she is rather given to fads. The trouble is that she hasn't enough imagination and HAS a tendency to indigestion.
His officers affected a superiority over the rest of us, but the boredom of their souls appeared in their manner of dreary submission to the fads of their commander.
My muscles were small and soft, like a woman's, or so the doctors had said time and again in the course of their attempts to persuade me to go in for physical-culture fads. But I had preferred to use my head rather than my body; and here I was, in no fit condition for the rough life in prospect.
After all, if these people had strange fads and expected obedience on the most extraordinary matters, they were at least ready to pay for their eccentricity.
The layman is full of fads, and he doesn't like his doctor to have anything the matter with him."
I don't believe in all these fads, and yet I don't like saying that I don't believe in them."
Why, the good woman thinks that I have nothing to do but to write cheques for her silly fads."
Debienne and Poligny, who were always charming to me, had neglected, before leaving, to mention my little fads to you.
If that man had been an ordinary lunatic I would have taken my chance of trusting him, but he seems so mixed up with the Count in an indexy kind of way that I am afraid of doing anything wrong by helping his fads. I can't forget how he prayed with almost equal fervor for a cat, and then tried to tear my throat out with his teeth.
Don't be disagreeable and full of ridiculous fads, Sidney dear.
She was disposed rather to accuse the intolerable narrowness and the purblind conscience of the society around her: and Celia was no longer the eternal cherub, but a thorn in her spirit, a pink-and-white nullifidian, worse than any discouraging presence in the "Pilgrim's Progress." The fad of drawing plans!
The war with Spain, many years' generous mint and watermelon crops, a few long-shot winners at the New Orleans race-track, and the brilliant banquets given by the Indiana and Kansas citizens who compose the North Carolina Society have made the South rather a "fad" in Manhattan.