brown dwarf

(redirected from Failed star)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

brown dwarf

n.
A celestial body that is more massive than a gas giant planet but has insufficient mass to sustain the hydrogen fusion reactions that produce radiant energy in normal stars.

brown dwarf

n
(Astronomy) a type of celestial body midway in mass between a large planet and a small star

brown′ dwarf′


n.
a cold, dark star that is too small to initiate the nuclear reactions that generate heat and light.

brown dwarf

(broun)
A celestial body that is similar to a star but does not emit light because it does not have enough mass to ignite internal nuclear fusion. See Note at dwarf star.
Translations
ruskea kääpiö
barna törpe
brun dverg
brun dvärg
References in periodicals archive ?
Smoothly blended combo of archival footage, fresh interviews, (somewhat stiff) re-enactments and campy artifacts from the period is both entertaining and insightful, presaging Reagan's failed Star Wars buildup and the current Iraq War.
Unison will be responding fully to the consultation and giving the proposals rigorous scrutiny to ensure that the failed star system is not replicated.
I APPLAUD Joan Burnie's condemnation of the proposed resurrection of Reagan's failed Star Wars system by the Bush administration.
This has led some scientists to speculate that rather than a planet it might be a brown dwarf, a failed star too small to shine.
And joining the long list is OGLE-2016-BLG-1190Lb, a planetary object so massive the team behind its discovery isn't even sure if it is a gigantic planet or a failed star.
Not a lot, in a climate given over to failed star vehicles (Patrick Stewart in "The Master Builder"), feeble revues (the far-from-zippy "Zipp
But the mass that a brown dwarf accumulates is not enough to ignite thermonuclear reactions in its core, resulting in a failed star that is very cool.
The body, about eight times as heavy as Jupiter, resides next to a failed star, a brown dwarf dubbed 2M1207 (SN: 5/7/05, p.
html) brown dwarf - a failed star that's too large to be a planet, but lacks the mass necessary to start nuclear fusion in its core - located five billion miles away.
Barely more massive than a planet itself, a failed star 500 light-years from Earth is nevertheless cloaked in a disk of gas and dust from which planets could coalesce.
Upon his success, McNeil reflected: "I find it simply stunning that a $1,000 scope, which I literally pieced together on my kitchen table, was able to detect a 21st-magnitude object whose identity as a failed star was announced only days before I arrived at TSP.
Kevin Luhman, Penn State's Associate Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics classifies this object as a "brown dwarf" - an object that formed just like a star out of a massive cloud of duct and gas, but the mass that it accumulates is not enough to ignite thermonuclear reactions in its core, resulting in a failed star that is very cool.