Macbeth

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Mac·beth

 (mək-bĕth′) Died 1057.
King of Scotland (1040-1057) who ascended the throne after killing King Duncan (died 1040) in battle. Legends of his rise to power and reign are the basis of Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Macbeth

(məkˈbɛθ; mæk-)
n
(Biography) died 1057, king of Scotland (1040–57): succeeded Duncan, whom he killed in battle; defeated and killed by Duncan's son Malcolm III
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mac•beth

(məkˈbɛθ, mæk-)

n.
died 1057, king of Scotland 1040–57: subject of a tragedy by Shakespeare.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Macbeth - king of Scotland (died in 1057)Macbeth - king of Scotland (died in 1057)  
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fair is foul, and foul is fair. In one of the most searing portrayals of evil ever written, Shakespeare examines the dangers of ambition, the means by which a country and an individual can disintegrate, and the potentially overwhelming power of the human conscience.
If O'Donnell isn't an actual witch, she and her telegenic tea partiers represent chaos and confusion as clearly as the three weird sisters in "Macbeth." Consider the sisters' lines in the first act of Shakespeare's play: "Fair is foul, and foul is fair: Hover through the fog and filthy air." Our modern-day political sorceresses make the literary ones look like amateurs.

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