maladroit

(redirected from Fall Together)
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mal·a·droit

 (măl′ə-droit′)
adj.
Marked by a lack of adroitness; inept.
n.
An inept person.

[French : mal-, mal- + adroit, adroit; see adroit.]

mal′a·droit′ly adv.
mal′a·droit′ness n.

maladroit

(ˌmæləˈdrɔɪt)
adj
1. showing or characterized by clumsiness; not dexterous
2. tactless and insensitive in behaviour or speech
[C17: from French, from mal badly + adroit]
ˌmalaˈdroitly adv
ˌmalaˈdroitness n

mal•a•droit

(ˌmæl əˈdrɔɪt)

adj.
lacking in adroitness; awkward.
[1665–75; < French, Middle French]
mal`a•droit′ly, adv.
mal`a•droit′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.maladroit - not adroitmaladroit - not adroit; "a maladroit movement of his hand caused the car to swerve"; "a maladroit translation"; "maladroit propaganda"
awkward - lacking grace or skill in manner or movement or performance; "an awkward dancer"; "an awkward gesture"; "too awkward with a needle to make her own clothes"; "his clumsy fingers produced an awkward knot"
adroit - quick or skillful or adept in action or thought; "an exceptionally adroit pianist"; "an adroit technician"; "his adroit replies to hecklers won him many followers"; "an adroit negotiator"

maladroit

adjective clumsy, awkward, bungling, inept, cack-handed (informal), inexpert, unskilful, unhandy, ham-fisted or ham-handed (informal) Some of his first interviews with the press were rather maladroit.

maladroit

adjective
1. Lacking dexterity and grace in physical movement:
Slang: klutzy.
Idiom: all thumbs.
2. Clumsily lacking in the ability to do or perform:
3. Lacking sensitivity and skill in dealing with others:
Translations

maladroit

[ˈmæləˈdrɔɪt] ADJtorpe

maladroit

adj, maladroitly
advungeschickt

maladroit

[ˌmæləˈdrɔɪt] adjmaldestro/a
References in classic literature ?
If they could only fall together, and both be dashed to pieces, how fit, how desirable.
If they could both fall together into the current now, their arms would be so tightly clasped together that they could not be saved; they would go out of the world almost painlessly, and there would be no more reproach to her, or to him for marrying her.
For if," said he, "you throw among five YAHOOS as much food as would be sufficient for fifty, they will, instead of eating peaceably, fall together by the ears, each single one impatient to have all to itself; and therefore a servant was usually employed to stand by while they were feeding abroad, and those kept at home were tied at a distance from each other: that if a cow died of age or accident, before a HOUYHNHNM could secure it for his own YAHOOS, those in the neighbourhood would come in herds to seize it, and then would ensue such a battle as I had described, with terrible wounds made by their claws on both sides, although they seldom were able to kill one another, for want of such convenient instruments of death as we had invented.
Our two men, as they confessed to me, were grieved to be obliged to kill so many poor creatures, who had no notion of their danger; yet, having them all thus in their power, and the first having loaded his piece again, resolved to let fly both together among them; and singling out, by agreement, which to aim at, they shot together, and killed, or very much wounded, four of them; the fifth, frightened even to death, though not hurt, fell with the rest; so that our men, seeing them all fall together, thought they had killed them all.
They wait with each other, comfort each other, embrace each other, and rise and fall together.
Once they'll be in place, everything will fall together, hopefully."
Press and nation rise and fall together John Wilkes, a radical and popular politician of London, a journalist and pioneer of freedom of press in Britain during the eighteen century writing in the first issue of his weekly newspaper "The North Britain" in 1762 said, "Freedom of expression is the bulwark of all other liberties in Britain." This quote almost has a biblical sanctity for all the nations who value human rights and liberties and their significance in the nation building, especially those professing democratic dispensations.
(The Charlotte Observer has won five Pulitzers over the years, including editorial cartoonist Kevin Siers in 2014, and has been a finalist several other times.) In 1904, Joseph Pulitzer said, "Our republic and its press will rise or fall together." That truth isn't as obvious to some folks these days.
The pieces fall together and they race to try to stop Rana getting on board the plane.
Good things fall apart so better things can fall together."
"You believe lies so that you will eventually learn to trust no one but yourself, and sometimes good things fall apart so better things can fall together."
This would almost certainly prompt Brussels to cancel an entire package of other bilateral agreements that stand or fall together.