Fall of Man

(redirected from Fall from Paradise)
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Related to Fall from Paradise: Paradise Lost
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Noun1.Fall of Man - (Judeo-Christian mythology) when Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil in the Garden of Eden, God punished them by driving them out of the Garden of Eden and into the world where they would be subject to sickness and pain and eventual deathFall of Man - (Judeo-Christian mythology) when Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil in the Garden of Eden, God punished them by driving them out of the Garden of Eden and into the world where they would be subject to sickness and pain and eventual death
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
turning point, landmark, watershed - an event marking a unique or important historical change of course or one on which important developments depend; "the agreement was a watershed in the history of both nations"
References in periodicals archive ?
Heaven on Earth is a classic re-telling of the story of Adam and Eve and their fall from Paradise.
'Paradis Perduis,' the French translation by poet-philosopher Paul Valery of John Milton's 17th-century epic poem 'Paradise Lost' which tells the biblical story of Man's fall from paradise, the temptation of Adam and Eve by the fallen angel Satan.
The town centre is small, just a few streets and the Vergonha (Shame Square), a pretty place where two statues symbolise the fall from Paradise. Just across the square is a stark real-life reminder of the hell that Kuito descended into six years ago: three pock-marked and shelled-out government buildings.
Commenting on the Book of Genesis, Augustine reasoned that after the fall from paradise, Adam and his descendants were bound by the precept to increase and multiply until it had been fulfilled by Abraham and his descendants, the patriarchs.