fallout

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fall·out

 (fôl′out′)
n.
1.
a. The slow descent of minute particles of debris in the atmosphere following an explosion, especially the descent of radioactive debris after a nuclear explosion.
b. The particles that descend in this fashion.
2. An incidental result or side effect: "Other social trends also have psychiatric fallout, and the people who suffer can't afford treatment" (Martha Farnsworth Riche).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fallout

(ˈfɔːlˌaʊt)
n
1. (General Physics) the descent of solid material in the atmosphere onto the earth, esp of radioactive material following a nuclear explosion
2. (General Physics) any solid particles that so descend
3. informal side-effects; secondary consequences
vb (intr, adverb)
4. informal to quarrel or disagree
5. (intr) to happen or occur
6. (Military) military to leave a parade or disciplinary formation
sentence substitute
(Military) military the order to leave a parade or disciplinary formation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fall′out`

or fall′-out`,



n.
1. the settling to the ground of airborne particles ejected into the atmosphere from the earth by explosions, eruptions, forest fires, etc., esp. such settling from nuclear explosions.
2. the particles themselves.
3. an incidental effect, outcome, or product.
[1945–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fallout

The precipitation to Earth of radioactive particulate matter from a nuclear cloud; also applied to the particulate matter itself.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

fallout

Radioactive matter which has fallen to Earth after a nuclear explosion.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fallout - the radioactive particles that settle to the ground after a nuclear explosionfallout - the radioactive particles that settle to the ground after a nuclear explosion
dust - fine powdery material such as dry earth or pollen that can be blown about in the air; "the furniture was covered with dust"
2.fallout - any adverse and unwanted secondary effect; "a strategy to contain the fallout from the accounting scandal"
consequence, effect, result, upshot, outcome, event, issue - a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon; "the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"; "his decision had depressing consequences for business"; "he acted very wise after the event"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

fallout

noun consequences, results, effects, outcome, repercussions, upshot It is the political fallout of the riots which has preoccupied most of the British Press.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
سَقْطٌ إشْعاعي
radioaktivní odpadspad
laskeumasivuvaikutus
radioaktív csapadék
ofanfall
rádioaktívny spad

fallout

[ˈfɔːlaʊt]
A. N
1. [of radioactivity] → lluvia f radiactiva
2. (fig) → consecuencias fpl, repercusiones fpl
B. CPD fallout shelter Nrefugio m atómico or nuclear
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fallout

[ˈfɔːlaʊt] n
(after nuclear explosion)retombées fpl
radioactive fallout → retombées radioactives
(fig) (= consequences) [incident] → répercussions fpl; [scandal] → retombées fpl
the political fallout → les retombées politiques
in the fallout from sth → à la suite de qchfallout shelter nabri m antiatomique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fallout

nradioaktiver Niederschlag, Fallout m, → Fall-out m (spec); (fig)Auswirkungen pl (→ from +gen); fallout shelterAtomschutzbunker m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fallout

[ˈfɔːlˌaʊt] npioggia radioattiva (fig) (repercussions) → ripercussione f
fallout shelter → rifugio antiatomico
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fall

(foːl) past tense fell (fel) : past participle ˈfallen verb
1. to go down from a higher level usually unintentionally. The apple fell from the tree; Her eye fell on an old book.
2. (often with over) to go down to the ground etc from an upright position, usually by accident. She fell (over).
3. to become lower or less. The temperature is falling.
4. to happen or occur. Easter falls early this year.
5. to enter a certain state or condition. She fell asleep; They fell in love.
6. (formal. only with it as subject) to come as one's duty etc: It falls to me to take care of the children.
noun
1. the act of falling. He had a fall.
2. (a quantity of) something that has fallen. a fall of snow.
3. capture or (political) defeat. the fall of Rome.
4. (American) the autumn. Leaves change colour in the fall.
falls noun plural
a waterfall. the Niagara Falls.
ˈfallout noun
radioactive dust from a nuclear explosion etc.
his/her etc face fell
he, she etc looked suddenly disappointed.
fall away
1. to become less in number. The crowd began to fall away.
2. to slope downwards. The ground fell away steeply.
fall back
to move back or stop moving forward.
fall back on
to use, or to go to for help, finally when everything else has been tried. Whatever happens you have your father's money to fall back on.
fall behind
1. to be slower than (someone else). Hurry up! You're falling behind (the others); He is falling behind in his schoolwork.
2. (with with) to become late in regular payment, letter-writing etc. Don't fall behind with the rent!
fall down (sometimes with on)
to fail (in). He's falling down on his job.
fall flat
(especially of jokes etc) to fail completely or to have no effect. Her joke fell flat.
fall for
1. to be deceived by (something). I made up a story to explain why I had not been at work and he fell for it.
2. to fall in love with (someone). He has fallen for your sister.
fall in with
1. to join with (someone) for company. On the way home we fell in with some friends.
2. to agree with (a plan, idea etc). They fell in with our suggestion.
fall off
to become smaller in number or amount. Audiences often fall off during the summer.
fall on/upon
to attack. The robbers fell on the old man and beat him; They fell hungrily upon the food.
fall out (sometimes with with)
to quarrel. I have fallen out with my sister.
fall short (often with of)
to be not enough or not good enough etc. The money we have falls short of what we need.
fall through
(of plans etc) to fail or come to nothing. Our plans fell through.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

fallout

n. cenizas radioactivas.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fallout

n (nuclear) lluvia radiactiva
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
SHAUN KELLY insists there was no fall-out behind the scenes after leaving Limerick.
I hope the 'culprits' continue to do what comes naturally and I look forward to the next fall-out.
Garry and David Flitcroft have become the Split-croft brothers following a fall-out when running a building business.
As part of a mutually-agreed mediation move, the city's two most important men agreed to keep silent about their differences in public to allow an intermediary to try to resolve the fall-out.
WEDDED BLISS: Franchising is a popular pastime for nervous entrepreneurs who want to tap into an already established business, but high fees and complex contracts could threaten a fall-out in the industry
FALL-OUT from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster may have led to a dramatic increase in infant deaths and deformities in Liverpool.
She added: "There is a high rate of conviction once a case gets to court but we have a big fall-out between an allegation being reported and getting to court.
fall-outs with friends and how it didn't last forever.
There were public fall-outs with key players such as Paul Pogba and Anthony Martial - who were both recalled by Solskjaer - but Young denied stories that the dressing room had celebrated Mourinho's departure.
Ronaldo standards fall-outs manager ' Towards the end of Mourinho's three years in charge at yrone the Bernabeu the relationship between star player and star manager was completely broken, and it looks to be heading the same way between Mourinho and Pogba at Old Trafford.
After the recent backroom fall-outs, boss Martin O'Neill was seeking an improved performance after his side leaked nine goals in their past two games.