fallacy

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Related to Fallacious arguments: fallacious reasoning

fal·la·cy

 (făl′ə-sē)
n. pl. fal·la·cies
1. A false notion.
2. A statement or an argument based on a false or invalid inference.
3. Incorrectness of reasoning or belief; erroneousness.
4. The quality of being deceptive.

[Alteration of Middle English fallace, from Old French, from Latin fallācia, deceit, from fallāx, fallāc-, deceitful, from fallere, to deceive.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fallacy

(ˈfæləsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. an incorrect or misleading notion or opinion based on inaccurate facts or invalid reasoning
2. unsound or invalid reasoning
3. the tendency to mislead
4. (Logic) logic an error in reasoning that renders an argument logically invalid
[C15: from Latin fallācia, from fallax deceitful, from fallere to deceive]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fal•la•cy

(ˈfæl ə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. a deceptive, misleading, or false notion, belief, etc.; misconception.
2. a misleading or unsound argument.
3. erroneousness.
4. any of various types of erroneous reasoning that render arguments logically unsound.
5. Obs. deception.
[1350–1400; Middle English fallace < Middle French < Latin fallācia a trick, deceit]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fallacy - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
pseudoscience - an activity resembling science but based on fallacious assumptions
misconception - an incorrect conception
logical fallacy - a fallacy in logical argumentation
pathetic fallacy - the fallacy of attributing human feelings to inanimate objects; `the friendly sun' is an example of the pathetic fallacy
sophism, sophistry, sophistication - a deliberately invalid argument displaying ingenuity in reasoning in the hope of deceiving someone
paralogism - an unintentionally invalid argument
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

fallacy

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

fallacy

noun
1. An erroneous or false idea:
2. Plausible but invalid reasoning:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مَظْهَر خادِع، مُغالَطَه
bludklamomyl
fejlslutningvildfarelse
téveszme
röng hugmynd, villa
klaidinga nuomonėklaidingas įsitikinimas
kļūdamaldi

fallacy

[ˈfæləsɪ] N (= false belief) → falacia f; (= false reasoning) → sofisma m, argucia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fallacy

[ˈfæləsi] nidée f fausse
it is a fallacy that ... → il est faux de croire que ...
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fallacy

nIrrtum m; (in logic) → Fehlschluss m, → Trugschluss m; a popular fallacyein weitverbreiteter Irrtum
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fallacy

[ˈfæləsɪ] nerrore m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fallacy

(ˈfӕləsi) plural ˈfallacies noun
a wrong idea or belief, usually one that is generally believed to be true; false reasoning. That belief is just a fallacy.
fallacious (fəˈleiʃəs) adjective
wrong, mistaken or showing false reasoning. a fallacious argument.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a need to have a critical look at some of these projects and to question the rationale, processes, implementation and logic and or fallacious arguments behind the said programmes.
This is, again, one of the fallacious arguments being disseminated by clueless armed opposition supporters who seem to lack critical thinking.
Common practices in times of war are propaganda, telling lies and presenting fallacious arguments to shape public opinion and block criticism.
Similarly, Alouane's article in chapter eight and Howard's in chapter nine point to other fallacious arguments regarding the bans.
Such eagerness to embrace fallacious arguments played an important role in Donald Trump's election in 2016, and in the wake of his inauguration we are witnessing a continuation of such bamboozlement under the Trump administration's protectionist policies.
We are made to feel powerless-whether by nasty internet trolls spreading fallacious arguments and fabricated news and victimizing us with their sexually harassing comments, or getting our placards ripped by angry pro-Marcos mobs and even policemen.
Pragma-dialectics, an approach to argumentation developed by Frans van Eemeren and Rob Grootendorst (1987) and elaborated considerably since (see van Eemeren & Grootendorst, 1992; van Eemeren & Houtlosser, 2000; van Eemeren & Houtlosser, 2003; van Emeren & Houtlosser, 2006; van Eemeren, 2010; van Eemeren, Garssen, & Meuffels, 2012.) provides a compelling and parsimonious theoretical framework for analyzing fallacious arguments within the context of a rational critical conflict resolution process.
In 1809, Jeremy Bentham, the founder of utilitarianism, set to work on "The Book of Fallacies." His goal was to expose the fallacious arguments used to block reforms like the abolition of "rotten boroughs" -- electorates with so few electors that a powerful lord or landowner could effectively select the member of parliament, while newer cities such as Manchester remained unrepresented.Bentham collected examples of fallacies, often from parliamentary debates.
In his article, Biddle deals with several fallacious arguments made against a rights-respecting immigration policy.
Obviously, fallacious arguments conveying accusations against social organizations and the opposition of not allowing the government to work swept aside.
In all three of the issues I discuss here, and on several other issues, Smith uses obviously fallacious arguments in a context that implies that she is presenting Rand's own arguments.