fallibilist


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fallibilist

(ˈfælɪbəlɪst)
n
(Philosophy) a supporter of fallibilism
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to fallibilism
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Thus, Janich avoids the problem Roy Bhaskar (2008/1975) identified, that "to be a fallibilist about knowledge, it is necessary to be a realist about things," because "to be a sceptic about things is to be a dogmatist about knowledge" (p.
The culture of the sciences, by contrast, is investigative, speculative, generalizing, and thoroughly fallibilist: most scientific conjectures are sooner or later discarded, even the best-warranted claims are subject to revision if new evidence demands it, and progress is ragged and uneven....
This kind of thinking transferred work from the philosophy of science, such as Lakatos, Popper and Kuhn, onto the philosophy of mathematics, ultimately leading to a trajectory towards what Ernest (1991) termed the Fallibilist paradigm.
(158.) Contextualists also analogize "know" to familiar indexicals such as "I," "here," and "now." See, e.g., Stewart Cohen, How to Be a Fallibilist, 2 Phil.
The theory is correct anyway." Such was the modesty of an uncompromising fallibilist for whom the entanglement of fact and value was self-evident.
His reasoning was premised on the common fallibilist assumption that the one correct truth is usually unknowable and therefore the views of all four Sunni schools are equally valid.
But one can be a fallibilist about the human propensity to err while still maintaining belief in objective reality.
Perhaps they learned to express, or even respect, the other party's point of view, and to grasp certain limitations in their own understanding: as Fraenkel puts it, he has become a "fallibilist" who acknowledges that even his own views might be mistaken.
But more than exegesis is at stake for Hustwit, which is why the book is as refreshing as it is rewarding: by its conclusion, Hustwit's own conception of "fallibilist hermeneutics" emerges as a serious contender--as a genuinely live option--for those who want not merely to rehash what others have already had to say about the relationship between hermeneutics and philosophy, but for those who actually want to do some thinking of their own by putting those results to work.
This article examines avenues for resolving what appears to be an inherent tension in the fallibilist argument for pluralism in economics.
Popper understood the notion of the existence of essence from an Aristotelian perspective, albeit within this fallibilist epistemology.