false memory

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false memory

n.
An imagined event that is believed to be recalled as a memory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, these items are false memories, illusory experiences of events, actions, and utterances that never occurred." (159) But why do false memories arise and what can be learned from them?
Furthermore, they warned that the creation of false memories in legal proceedings was also associated with specific therapeutic techniques such as guided imagery, age regression, journaling, dream work and interpretation, EMDR, art therapy, feelings/emotional release work, group therapy, and bibliotherapy (Madden, 1998).
Spreading activation has been proposed as one explanation for the creation of false memories (Roediger & McDermott, 1995; Roediger et al., 1998, 2001).
It also addresses the growing issue of legal action against counselors for "inducing" false memories and how this may be avoided without compromising treatment.
There are true memories and there are false memories, as in the case of false memory syndrome.
He told the court he did not subscribe to recent theories of "false memory syndrome", whereby patients are supposed to recover false memories of past trauma under hypnosis or through counselling.
The videos are false memories of "trauma" associated with these sites.
Loftus testified that there is no credible scientific evidence for the notion that memories of years of brutalization can be massively repressed; that research has shown that memories, including memories for events that never happened, can be implanted in individuals; and that people can hold false memories with a lot of emotion and have a lot of confidence in and provide a lot of detail about their memories.
Smith's method, as well as his client manual, contains elements that may promote the creation of false memories. In a discussion of multiplicity, Smith (2000) noted, "the primary lie of a dissociative system is that the event never happened" (p.
Furthermore, Loftus's laboratory experiments do not mirror real-life trauma, and, for obvious ethical reasons, they only involve attempts to implant false memories of minor details that have no emotional significance to the subjects.
We often have false memories about how our parents and grandparents adapted to life in the world's most exciting city.
TV adverts could be planting false memories in viewers' minds, according to the British Association for the Advancement of Science.