façade

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fa·çade

also fa·cade  (fə-säd′)
n.
1. The face of a building, especially the principal face.
2. An artificial or deceptive front: ideological slogans that were a façade for power struggles.

[French, from Italian facciata, from faccia, face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

façade

(fəˈsɑːd; fæ-) or

facade

n
1. (Architecture) the face of a building, esp the main front
2. a front or outer appearance, esp a deceptive one
[C17: from French, from Italian facciata, from faccia face]

fa•cade

art at faceplate

or fa•çade

(fəˈsɑd, fæ-)

n.
1.
a. the front of a building, esp. an imposing or decorative one.
b. any side of a building facing a public way or space and finished accordingly.
2. a superficial appearance of something.
[1650–60; < French < Upper Italian faciada, Italian facciata, derivative of faccia face]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.façade - the face or front of a buildingfacade - the face or front of a building  
front - the side that is seen or that goes first
frontispiece - an ornamental facade
2.facade - a showy misrepresentation intended to conceal something unpleasant
deception, misrepresentation, deceit - a misleading falsehood

façade

noun
1. front, face, exterior, frontage the façade of the building
2. show, front, appearance, mask, exterior, guise, pretence, veneer, semblance They hid the troubles plaguing their marriage behind a façade of family togetherness.

façade

also facade
noun
1. The forward outer surface of a building:
Architecture: frontispiece.
Translations
مَظْهَر خَدّاعواجِهَة مَبْنى
фасада
fasádaprůčelítvářnostvzhled
facadefrontydre
épülethomlokzatkülszín
外観正面
faţadă
pozlátka
cephesahte görünüşyüz

façade

[fəˈsɑːd] N (Archit) → fachada f (fig) → apariencia f

facade

façade [fəˈsɑːd] n
(= frontage) [building] → façade f
(= show, semblance) → façade f
a facade of unity → une façade unitaire

façade

n (lit, fig)Fassade f

façade

facade [fəˈsɑːd] n (Archit) → facciata (fig) → facciata, apparenza

façade

(fəˈsaːd) noun
1. the front of a building. the façade of the temple.
2. a pretended show. In spite of his bold façade, he was very frightened.
References in classic literature ?
(fine girls of sixteen and seventeen) had grey beaver hats, then in fashion, shaded with ostrich plumes, and from under the brim of this graceful head-dress fell a profusion of light tresses, elaborately curled; the elder lady was enveloped in a costly velvet shawl, trimmed with ermine, and she wore a false front of French curls.
"Can my false front be crooked?" he asked himself, seized by one of those anxieties which beset old bachelors.
Crucial you get the ball in play and take on the second shot to an elevated two-tier green with a false front.
The vehicle features false front grille, aluminium beams finished in black and cameras instead of side mirrors.
An all-important second shot follows to one of the most severe greens on the course which features a false front that can make life tough from the back of the putting surface.
The association of used car importers claim that the passing of the bill by the plenum will devastate used car purchases, saying the government's environmental concerns are a false front, as the road tax will soar for older cars with lower emissions than newer luxury cars that will not be affected by the new regime.
You don't have to put on a false front. Connecting with friends will improve your mood.
Another clip shows Marc Campbell at the Bemrose Industrial Estate, off Long Lane, signing for a delivery of goods to P&M Plumbing - a false front company set up to cover the importation of huge consignments of cannabis from Barcelona.
In the end, George says, the ego is neither good nor bad, unless you start putting on a false front or believing in illusions about the self.
The skimming device consisted of a small camera, a card reader and a false front to disguise their capture of PIN numbers and card details for cloning later.
Attempts at such "false front" operations did not stop there, as this column noted several months back ('"Gun Control' Messages 'Evolve,'" July 2014), recounting further such "decoys." In addition to AHSA, the went-nowhere-fast American Rifle and Pistol Association was examined, and two better-financed (and still kicking) groups were pointed out: One, Mark and Gabby Giffords' Americans for Responsible Solutions, offers what it calls "commonsense solutions to protect our communities from gun violence" (which basically entails you and me obeying stupid infringements that the criminals doing all the damage will continue to disregard).