diorama

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Related to False perspective: Forced perspective

di·o·ram·a

 (dī′ə-răm′ə, -rä′mə)
n.
1. A three-dimensional miniature or life-size scene in which figures, stuffed wildlife, or other objects are arranged in a naturalistic setting against a painted background.
2. A scene reproduced on cloth transparencies with various lights shining through the cloths to produce changes in effect, intended for viewing at a distance through an aperture.

[French, blend of dia-, through (from Greek; see dia-) and panorama, panorama (from English; see panorama).]

di′o·ram′ic (-răm′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diorama

(ˌdaɪəˈrɑːmə)
n
1. (Art Terms) a miniature three-dimensional scene, in which models of figures are seen against a background
2. (Art Terms) a picture made up of illuminated translucent curtains, viewed through an aperture
3. (Art Terms) a museum display, as of an animal, of a specimen in its natural setting
4. (Film) films a scene produced by the rearrangement of lighting effects
[C19: from French, from Greek dia- through + Greek horama view, from horan to see]
dioramic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

di•o•ram•a

(ˌdaɪ əˈræm ə, -ˈrɑ mə)

n., pl. -ram•as.
1. a scene in miniature reproduced in three dimensions by placing figures before a painted background.
2. a life-size display representing a scene from nature, a historical event, or the like, using stuffed wildlife, wax figures, etc., in front of a painted or photographed background.
3. a partly translucent picture viewed through an aperture.
[1815–25; < French, =di- di-3 + Greek (h)órāma view (horā-, variant s. of horân to see, look + -ma n. suffix of result)]
di`o•ram′ic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

diorama

1. a miniature, three-dimensional scene, often depicting a historical event.
2. an apparatus designed for giving extra realism to paintings by transmitting light through them in various colors and intensities at different times.
See also: Representation
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diorama - a picture (or series of pictures) representing a continuous scenediorama - a picture (or series of pictures) representing a continuous scene
ikon, picture, icon, image - a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction) produced on a surface; "they showed us the pictures of their wedding"; "a movie is a series of images projected so rapidly that the eye integrates them"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

diorama

[daɪəˈrɑːmə] Ndiorama m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

diorama

nDiorama nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The lights rose to reveal a stage whose background was adorned by a landscape in medieval European style -- castles, rivers, fields and cities rendered a bit too close together for realism, and in a manner indifferent to the principles of false perspective.
"There were three yellow cards for each team in the second half, we started it chasing it towards the end, and that put a bit of a false perspective on the scoreline."
And in a way something I play with, particularly in one of the neons, is false perspective. They create the allusion of perspectival depth, but actually the green and the pink are on the same plane," Dawood says.
Schubert argues this gives a false perspective on commitment.
This is not only a false perspective, but also a self-fulfilling prophecy that causes children to become unnecessarily distressed.
It is this flaw in his approach to the ancient world that has led Brown to set the main argument of his book in what the present reviewer considers a false perspective. Brown starts from an erroneous picture of Constantine as an emperor who, though himself converted to Christianity in 312, had surprisingly little impact on the religious life of his subjects during his lifetime.
Sloping soffits at openings and oblique bedroom balcony walls combine to create a false perspective that heightens the theatricality of the architecture.