polyposis

(redirected from Familial polyposis)
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pol·yp·o·sis

 (pŏl′ə-pō′sĭs)
n. pl. pol·yp·o·ses (-sēz)
The presence of several polyps in the body.

polyposis

(ˌpɒlɪˈpəʊsɪs)
n
(Medicine) med the formation of many polyps or a condition characterized by such
Translations

pol·y·po·sis

n. poliposis, formación numerosa de pólipos.

polyposis

n poliposis f; familial adenomatous — poliposis adenomatosa familiar
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References in periodicals archive ?
This alternative to the conventional Brooke ileostomy allows a patient to be free of wearing an external pouch or appliance to collect waste following removal of the large intestine (colon) and rectum to cure conditions including Ulcerative Colitis and Familial Polyposis syndromes.
Familial polyposis coli: clinical manifestations, evaluation, management and treatment.
Observations on the origin of adenomatous epithelium of the colon: serial section studies of minute polyps in familial polyposis.
4) Other associated conditions include familial polyposis syndrome, Gardner's syndrome, (1) estrogen therapy and trauma.
Additional proposed risk factors include sedentary lifestyle, obesity, tobacco use, and alcohol consumption (1); while the commonly accepted high-risk groups for colon cancer are those aged >60 years, those with a positive family history of colorectal cancer, and those with familial polyposis syndrome.
Four of Patricia's five sisters inherited the tragic genetic legacy of familial polyposis coli which can lead to colon cancer.
It was a horrendous time for the family, made worse when doctors explained Patrick's cancer was a result of Familial Polyposis, a rare genetic condition where polyps form in the colon which, in time, turns to cancer.
The second study will compare the capsule with barium enema to detect small-bowel polyps in children with familial polyposis.
For one condition that we call familial polyposis, where we see people with hundreds of colon polyps, if they have a mutation in the gene associated with that condition, there is a 100 percent lifetime risk of developing colon cancer--obviously, very, very high.

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