Familist

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Familist

(ˈfæmɪlɪst)
n
(Christian Churches, other) a member of the Family of Love, a mystical Christian religious sect of the 16th and 17th centuries based upon love
ˈFamiˌlism n
References in periodicals archive ?
Familists, or the Family of Love, were a religious sect founded in the sixteenth century, with Anabaptist sentiments including rejection of infant baptism, the call for religious liberty for all, nonviolent resistance, and a refusal to bear arms.
In the words of Nathaniel Ward "all Familists, Antinomians, Anabaptists, and other Enthusiasts shall have free Liberty to keepe away from us, and such as will come to be gone as fast as they can, the sooner the better" (The Simple Cobbler of Aggawam 1647: 181).
(12) Familists were a reformist group whose beliefs had some similarities with those of the Anabaptists.
(28.) Familists were derided for promoting inclusivity and egalitarianism, exemplified by the lines from Dutch merchant Hendrik Niclaes's Evangelium Regni (Cologne: Printed by N.
Bailyn reminds us that William Bradford, the Pilgrim leader, would ever deny that the members of his flock were "Familists," or radical levelers seeking an "ecstatic union with Christ." They were much more pragmatic, a quality Bailyn unravels in the several chapters on the Puritans.
(7) A este respecto Mangani anade: "Familists were unconcerned with differences between faiths, welcoming as their co-religionist all who were able, with simplicity and devotion, to reach the condition of illumination, be they Catholics, Muslims, Jews or members of Reformed or Evangelical churches" (72).
In the play Familists assemble at a seedy city inn, dubbed 'The Hole in the Wall', to worship under the leadership of Mistress Purge, wife of a London apothecary.
The son of Street Cry scored by a short head from the useful Familists, who had triumphed in his previous two outings.
Familists & Libertines, which details both the politics of publishing about this controversy in the seventeenth century and the politics of attributing this text to John Winthrop in the nineteenth century.
(17) Starting points on the Familists are Hamilton; Marsh.
Part IV looks at identity and especially at the way outsiders constructed Italian women's identities as workers, familists, or in some cases as militants.
(52.) The Engagement Between the King and the Scots (1647), for example, called for the suppression of all "Anti-Trinitarians, Anabaptists, Antinomians, Arminians, Familists, Brownists, Separatists, Independents, Libertines, and Seekers," as well as "all blasphemy, heresy, schism, and all such scandalous doctrines and practices as are contrary to the light of nature, or to the known principles of Christianity."

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