orientation

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o·ri·en·ta·tion

 (ôr′ē-ĕn-tā′shən, -ən-)
n.
1. The act of orienting or the state of being oriented.
2. Location or position relative to the points of the compass.
3. The construction of a church so that its longitudinal axis has an east-west direction with the main altar usually at the eastern end.
4. The direction followed in the course of a trend, movement, or development.
5. A tendency of thought; a general inclination: a Marxist orientation.
6. Sexual orientation.
7.
a. An adjustment or adaptation to a new environment, situation, custom, or set of ideas.
b. Introductory instruction concerning a new situation: orientation for incoming students.
8. Psychology Awareness of the objective world in relation to one's self.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

orientation

(ˌɔːrɪɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the act or process of orienting or the state of being oriented
2. (Navigation) position or positioning with relation to the points of the compass or other specific directions
3. the adjustment or alignment of oneself or one's ideas to surroundings or circumstances
4. (Education) chiefly
a. a course, programme, lecture, etc, introducing a new situation or environment
b. (as modifier): an orientation talk.
5. (Psychology) psychol the knowledge of one's own temporal, social, and practical circumstances in life
6. basic beliefs or preferences: sexual orientation.
7. (Biology) biology the change in position of the whole or part of an organism in response to a stimulus, such as light
8. (Chemistry) chem the relative dispositions of atoms, ions, or groups in molecules or crystals
9. (Architecture) the siting of a church on an east-west axis, usually with the altar at the E end
ˌorienˈtational adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

o•ri•en•ta•tion

(ˌɔr i ənˈteɪ ʃən, -ɛn-, ˌoʊr-)

n.
1. the act or process of orienting.
2. the state of being oriented.
3. an introductory program to guide a person in adjusting to new surroundings, employment, or the like.
4. the ability to locate oneself in one's environment with reference to time, place, and people.
5. position in relation to true north, to points on the compass, or to a specific place or object.
6. the ascertainment of one's true position, as in a novel situation.
7. the general direction or tendency of one's approach, thoughts, etc.
8. the relative positions of certain atoms or groups.
[1830–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.orientation - the act of orienting
locating, positioning, emplacement, location, placement, position - the act of putting something in a certain place
2.orientation - an integrated set of attitudes and beliefs
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"
wavelength - a shared orientation leading to mutual understanding; "they are on the same wavelength"
experimentalism - an orientation that favors experimentation and innovation; "the children of psychologists are often raised in an atmosphere of experimentalism"
reorientation - a fresh orientation; a changed set of attitudes and beliefs
perspective, view, position - a way of regarding situations or topics etc.; "consider what follows from the positivist view"
orthodoxy - a belief or orientation agreeing with conventional standards
heresy, heterodoxy, unorthodoxy - any opinions or doctrines at variance with the official or orthodox position
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
religious orientation - an attitude toward religion or religious practices
3.orientation - position or alignment relative to points of the compass or other specific directions
direction - the spatial relation between something and the course along which it points or moves; "he checked the direction and velocity of the wind"
attitude - position of aircraft or spacecraft relative to a frame of reference (the horizon or direction of motion)
horizontal - something that is oriented horizontally
vertical - something that is oriented vertically
quarter - one of the four major division of the compass; "the wind is coming from that quarter"
4.orientation - a predisposition in favor of something; "a predilection for expensive cars"; "his sexual preferences"; "showed a Marxist orientation"
predisposition - an inclination beforehand to interpret statements in a particular way
5.orientation - a person's awareness of self with regard to position and time and place and personal relationships
self-awareness - awareness of your own individuality
6.orientation - a course introducing a new situation or environment
course, course of instruction, course of study, class - education imparted in a series of lessons or meetings; "he took a course in basket weaving"; "flirting is not unknown in college classes"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

orientation

noun
1. inclination, tendency, bias, leaning, bent, disposition, predisposition, predilection, proclivity, partiality, turn of mind The party is liberal and democratic in orientation.
3. position, situation, location, site, bearings, direction, arrangement, whereabouts, disposition, coordination The orientation of the church is such that the front faces the square.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

orientation

noun
One's place and direction relative to one's surroundings:
bearing (often used in plural), location, position, situation.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
الإتِّجاه نَحو الشَّرْق، تَكَيُّف
orientering
betájolásirányorientációtájékozódástájolás
áttun; òaî aî ná áttum
yönelim

orientation

[ˌɔːrɪenˈteɪʃən]
A. Norientación f
B. CPD orientation course Ncurso m de orientación
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

orientation

[ˌɔːriənˈteɪʃən] n [organization, country] → orientation f
The movement is liberal and social democratic in orientation → Le mouvement est d'orientation libérale et sociale-démocrate.
[person] (sexual, political, religious)orientation f
discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation → la discrimination sur la base de l'orientation sexuelle
(= induction) → orientation f, stage m d'accueil orientation courseorientation course nséance f d'information
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

orientation

n
(= getting one’s bearing)Orientierung f; (fig)Ausrichtung f, → Orientierung f
(= position, direction) (lit: of boat, spaceship etc) → Kurs m; (fig)Orientierung f; (= attitude)Einstellung f(towards zu); (Comput: for printing) → Ausrichtung f; (= leaning)Ausrichtung f (→ towards auf +acc); sexual orientationsexuelle Orientierung
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

orientation

[ˌɔːrɪənˈteɪʃn] norientamento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

orientate

(ˈoːriənteit) (American) orient (ˈoːriənt) verb
1. to get (oneself) used to unfamiliar surroundings, conditions etc.
2. to find out one's position in relation to something else. The hikers tried to orientate themselves before continuing their walk.
ˌorienˈtation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

or·i·en·ta·tion

n. orientación, dirección.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

orientation

n orientación f; sexual — orientación sexual
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers first read independently each interview's transcript line by line, writing down memos along the text, in order to capture and identify initial units of meaning (categories) that emerged from the data (e.g., "family of origin," "intimate partner," "encounter with battered women").
She also uses the concept of open and closed families to describe the family of origin. An open family is one which can extend itself to a new family member who is as racially different, while a closed family is typically unable to do so.
An exploratory study comparing ACoAs to Non-ACoAs on family of origin relationships.
When a genogram is used in counseling, the college counselor gains a abundance of information concerning systemic patterns within the client's family of origin. Although a genogram is advantageous simply as a method of gathering and analyzing information, it is also capable of deepening client awareness and insight (Vinson, 1995).
Marital and parent-child relationships in the family of origin and marital change following the birth of a baby: A retrospective analysis.
Some studies found no gender differences in perceived family climate (Dancy & Handal, 1981) or perceived autonomy and intimacy in the family of origin (Manley, Searight, Skitka, & Russo, 1993).
income and socioeconomic status of the family of origin) and subjective conditions which affect the life satisfaction of the adolescents.
Upon completion of fingerprinting for all YOY samples, each fall YOY fingerprint was visually compared to each family fingerprint to determine its family of origin, following the same procedures illustrated in Gross et al.
Understanding Macon's statement depends upon recognizing the system of relations he has helped create in his family, and of the dynamics of his family of origin. The context of the Dead's domestic violence reveals that Macon's brutality is embedded in a family organization used to sustain and preserve the family's unity.
An important common denominator in these women's backgrounds was economic insecurity in the family of origin. The most frequently listed parental occupation was labourer (twenty percent of penitents gave this as their father's occupation).
Crawford finds that the family of origin of about two-thirds of the ex-slaves was a two-parent family, although in a sizable number of cases the father lived apart on a nearby plantation.
Whereas youngsters have no control over their "family of origin" and seek a coherent identity by viewing sibling and parental relationships through a unique prism, adults -- at least in successful marriages -- strive to create shared experiences that foster a sense of belonging and connection, suggests psychologist Avshalom Caspi of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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