Fang Lizhi


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Fang Lizhi

(fæŋ ˈliːˈdʒɪ)
n
(Biography) 1936–2012, Chinese astrophysicist and human-rights campaigner, lived in the US from 1990
References in periodicals archive ?
Having served six years in Beijing (1987-90) and (1995-98), and having already experienced the Tiananmen Massacre and then serving as the liaison officer for thirteen months for Fang Lizhi and Li ShuXian who had sought refuge in our Embassy, I had no desire to return when I had completed my second tour.
Fang Lizhi, one of the first, came to teach physics after being deemed too politically outspoken to work on the bomb.
The journalist Liu Binyan, the educator Fang Lizhi, and the intellectual Wang Ruowang were expelled from the party.
Outspoken Astronomer "The Chinese astrophysicist Fang Lizhi has become China's best-known dissident.
Once again, Fang Lizhi's life holds an important clue.
FANG LIZHI AND FREEDOM (The Wall Street Journal, New York)
Washington, Apr 8 ( ANI ): Chinese dissident Fang Lizhi, whose speeches were a key inspiration for the country's pro-democracy movement in the 1980s, has died in the United States at the age of 76.
However, Deng is most remembered for the cloud he cast over what Vogel calls the "Tiananmen tragedy." The author has come under attack by Fang Lizhi and others for glossing over Deng's repressive role in crushing the demonstrations at Tiananmen Square in the spring of 1989.
In the lead-up to the Tiananmen Square protests, Deng was contemptuous of the respected astrophysicist Fang Lizhi, who advocated greater freedom of expression and a more open political system, because in Deng's mind loosened strictures would undermine Chinas ability to sustain its rapid economic growth.
Others include Fang Lizhi, a physicist who was active in pro-democracy movement, and Wuer Kaixi, a former student leader of Uyghur ethnicity.
Lilley also tells-all regarding how the US embassy gave safe haven to Chinese dissident Fang Lizhi and his wife, Li Shuxian.
Winston Lord's recollection of President George Bush's visit to Beijing in 1989, and the Fang Lizhi fiasco, is just one illustration that makes for stimulating reading.