fanon


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Fa·non

 (făn′ən, fă-nôN′), Frantz 1925-1961.
Martinique-born French writer and psychiatrist whose works analyze the power dynamics and psychological effects of oppression and colonization.

fanon

(ˈfænən)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) a collar-shaped vestment worn by the pope when celebrating mass
2. (Roman Catholic Church) (formerly) various pieces of embroidered fabric used in the liturgy
[Middle English, of Germanic origin; related to Old High German fano cloth]
References in periodicals archive ?
"Un important stress chez une femme enceinte multiplie le risque d'un accouchement premature, voire meme d'une maladie physiologique ou mental chez l'enfant", ont estime les intervenants a cette journee d'etude, abritee par l'Institut de nephrologie du CHU Franz Fanon, sous le signe "Le stress...un tueur silencieux".
Frantz Fanon em uma leitura feminista interseccional
Neste artigo propomos uma releitura da recepcao da traducao do martinicano Frantz Fanon no Brasil em dois momentos especificos entre 1960 a 1970 e 1980 a 1990 a fim de afirmar a sua influencia no pensamento critico da filosofa Lelia Gonzalez e da psicanalista Neusa Santos Souza.
In a recently published essay titled "Frantz Fanon's
Fanon recognised that the discourse of race has been given undue credibility.
As for Fanon's "anticolonial artists," the Makerere found the pre-apartheid synthetic visions of their South African forefathers politically inappropriate.
Frantz Fanon's exploration of France's racial divides in his book Black Skin, White Masks, (1967) lends credence to Beaman's observation.
Frantz Fanon till this day remains one of the most important anti-colonialist thinkers.
Frantz Fanon. Edited by Jean Khalfa and Robert J.C.
Ciccariello-Maher uses a three-pronged approach to the decolonization of class, race, and "the people." First, he demonstrates how Georges Sorel decolonized class by insisting on a reconfiguration of the category from an "objective set of conditions" to one felt and lived by people (a mythical notion of class) and one that foregrounds "class-for-itself." Second, he uses Franz Fanon's reconfiguration of masterslave dialectics.