Faraday effect


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Related to Faraday effect: Faraday rotation

Faraday effect

n.
The rotation of the plane of polarization of either a plane-polarized light beam passed through a transparent isotropic medium or a plane-polarized microwave passing through a magnetic field along the lines of that field. Also called Faraday rotation.

[After Michael Faraday.]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The gravitational Faraday effect, first predicted in the 1950s, theorizes that when linearly polarized light travels close to a spinning black hole, the orientation of its polarization rotates according to Einstein's theory of general relativity.
External EM fields affect light transmission in the optical fiber through electro-optic Kerr effect and Faraday effect.
The plane of linearly polarized light is rotated when a magnetic field is applied parallel to the propagation direction, and this phenomenon is called, the Faraday effect.
It is the resonance equivalent of the empirically observable inverse Faraday effect and therefore there is indirect empirical evidence for its existence.
These effects are in addition to what is known as the Faraday effect, a polarization of light caused by intergalactic magnetic fields.
These highly birefringent fibers are designed with excellent dimensional uniformity and low beat lengths for applications including planar waveguides, visible light sensor probes, and Faraday effect devices.