Faeroese

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Faer·o·ese

 (fâr′ō-ēz′, -ēs′)
n.
Variant of Faroese.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Faeroese

(ˌfɛərəʊˈiːz) or

Faroese

adj
1. (Placename) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Faeroes, their inhabitants, or their language
2. (Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Faeroes, their inhabitants, or their language
3. (Languages) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Faeroes, their inhabitants, or their language
npl -ese
4. (Languages) the chief language of the Faeroes, closely related to Icelandic, although they are not mutually intelligible
5. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of the Faeroes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Faer•o•ese

or Far•o•ese

(ˌfɛər oʊˈiz, -ˈis)

n., pl. -ese,
adj. n.
1. a native or inhabitant of the Faeroe Islands.
2. the North Germanic language of the Faeroese.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Faeroe Islands, their inhabitants, or the language Faeroese.
[1850–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Faeroese - a Scandinavian language (closely related to Icelandic) that is spoken on the Faroe Islands
Nordic, North Germanic, North Germanic language, Scandinavian language, Scandinavian, Norse - the northern family of Germanic languages that are spoken in Scandinavia and Iceland
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tota Arnadottir holds an MA in Faroese language and literature from the Faroese University, where she is currently an assistant professor in oral tradition.
The exceptions to the latter are: Icelandic, Yiddish and also the Faroese language in its original version, since these three Germanic languages have arguably gone on being V-to-T.
The Faroese language is descended from Old Norse, brought by the first settlers from Norway.