Fatimid

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Fat·i·mid

 (făt′ə-mĭd′) also Fat·i·mite (-mīt′)
A Muslim dynasty that ruled North Africa and parts of Egypt (909-1171).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Fatimid

(ˈfætɪmɪd)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of the Muslim dynasty, descended from Fatima, daughter of Mohammed, and Ali, her husband, that ruled over North Africa and parts of Egypt and Syria (909–1171)
2. (Historical Terms) Also called: Fatimite a descendant of Fatima and Ali
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Fat•i•mid

(ˈfæt ə mɪd)

also Fat•i•mite

(-ˌmaɪt)

n.
1. any caliph of the North African dynasty, 909–1171, claiming descent from Fatima and Ali.
2. any descendant of Fatima and Ali.
[1720–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
fatimide
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References in periodicals archive ?
What makes these maps and the accompanying information so important--and indeed poignant--is that by the time this copy was made in 1200, the Fatimid empire had been destroyed by Saladin on his way to defeating the Crusaders.
Al-Qadi al-Nu'man was a prominent judge, jurist, and author of the Fatimid Empire (296-567/909-1171), says Stuart, and in many ways the young Fatimid state's chief ideologue for nearly half a century.
Given the Fatimid empire's diversity and the diverse audiences of the Fatimid orations, how are scholars to approach this gap in the sources as well as the tacit expectation that the imams' words and orations would have been recorded and redacted in written form?
This jar exemplifies the magnificence of the lustre pottery technique which reached its height in the eleventh century, reflecting the power and patronage of the Fatimid empire. It is estimated at Au300,000-500,000.