convulsion

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Related to Febrile convulsions: Febrile seizure

con·vul·sion

 (kən-vŭl′shən)
n.
1. An intense, paroxysmal, involuntary muscular contraction.
2. An uncontrolled fit, as of laughter; a paroxysm.
3. Violent turmoil: "The market convulsions of the last few weeks have shaken the world" (Felix Rohatyn).

convulsion

(kənˈvʌlʃən)
n
1. (Medicine) a violent involuntary contraction of a muscle or muscles
2. a violent upheaval, disturbance, or agitation, esp a social one
3. (usually plural) informal uncontrollable laughter: I was in convulsions.
conˈvulsionary adj

con•vul•sion

(kənˈvʌl ʃən)

n.
1. contortion of the body caused by violent, involuntary muscular contractions.
2. a violent disturbance.
3. an outburst of great, uncontrollable laughter.
[1575–85; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.convulsion - a sudden uncontrollable attack; "a paroxysm of giggling"; "a fit of coughing"; "convulsions of laughter"
attack - a sudden occurrence of an uncontrollable condition; "an attack of diarrhea"
2.convulsion - violent uncontrollable contractions of muscles
ictus, raptus, seizure - a sudden occurrence (or recurrence) of a disease; "he suffered an epileptic seizure"
clonus - convulsion characterized by alternating contractions and relaxations
epileptic seizure - convulsions accompanied by impaired consciousness
3.convulsion - a violent disturbanceconvulsion - a violent disturbance; "the convulsions of the stock market"
commotion, hoo-ha, hoo-hah, hurly burly, kerfuffle, to-do, disruption, disturbance, flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
4.convulsion - a physical disturbance such as an earthquake or upheaval
trouble - an event causing distress or pain; "what is the trouble?"; "heart trouble"

convulsion

noun
1. spasm, fit, shaking, seizure, contraction, tremor, cramp, contortion, paroxysm He fell to the floor in the grip of an epileptic convulsion.
2. upheaval, disturbance, furore, turbulence, agitation, commotion, tumult It was a decade that saw many great social, economic and political convulsions.

convulsion

noun
1. The condition of being physically agitated:
2. A momentous or sweeping change:
3. A condition of anguished struggle and disorder:
paroxysm, throe (used in plural).
Translations
křeč
krampekrampeanfaldkrampetrækning
kohtauskouristusmullistus
grč
háborgásrángató zásrángatózásrengés
rykkir, krampi
katılmasarsılma

convulsion

[kənˈvʌlʃən] N
1. (= fit, seizure) → convulsión f
to have convulsionstener convulsiones
2. (fig) → conmoción f
they were in convulsions [of laughter] → se desternillaban de risa

convulsion

[kənˈvʌlʃən] n (MEDICINE) (= fit) → convulsion f

convulsion

n
(Med) → Schüttelkrampf m no pl, → Konvulsion f (spec); (of crying) → Weinkrampf m no pl
(caused by social upheaval etc) → Erschütterung f
(inf, of laughter) to go into/be in convulsionssich biegen or schütteln vor Lachen; he had the audience in convulsionser rief beim Publikum wahre Lachstürme hervor

convulsion

[kənˈvʌlʃn] n (fit, seizure) → convulsione f
in convulsions (fam) (laughter) → piegato/a in due (dalle risate)

convulse

(kənˈvals) verb
to shake violently. convulsed with laughter.
conˈvulsive (-siv) adjective
conˈvulsively adverb
conˈvulsion (-ʃən) noun
(often in plural) a sudden stiffening or jerking of the muscles of the body.

con·vul·sion

n. convulsión, contracción involuntaria de un músculo;
febrile ______ febril;
Jacksonian ______ Jacksoniana;
tonic-clonic ______ tonicoclónica.

convulsion

n convulsión f, ataque m (fam)
References in periodicals archive ?
Parents should be made aware that studies have demonstrated that giving antipyretics to the child, either acutely or regularly for their fever, does not reduce the risk of recurrent febrile convulsions and the only rationale behind its administration will make the child more comfortable (Lux, 2010).
Of these 11 HEV68 cases, 10 were in patients diagnosed with acute respiratory illnesses, such as asthmatic bronchitis or pneumonia, and one in a patient with febrile convulsions (4).
They kept an eye on Rosie for 48 hours, monitored her for a year afterwards just to make sure there were no further febrile convulsions and now she's a healthy 16-year-old."
But her worries were dismissed, and the fits explained as febrile convulsions possibly emanating from an ear infection.
Western Australia has seen the bulk of the cases, with 55 children aged 5 and younger suffering febrile convulsions after receiving the vaccination and 196 children also reportedly experiencing vomiting and fever.
Such temperatures are usually caused by heat stroke or brain injury and, if so, they do not respond to paracetamol There is also no evidence that paracetamol prevents febrile convulsions. In a controlled trial in children with post-febrile convulsion, those given paracetamol 15-20mg/kg every four hours were just as likely to have another convulsion as children given paracetamol only when their rectal temperature exceeded 37.9 degrees C.
They include febrile convulsions and breath-holding attacks.
A Febrile convulsions are seizures associated with a fever in children aged six months to five years.
Throughout the morning she was showing no signs of improvement and because she has a history of febrile convulsions I telephoned our GP for an appointment.
In July 1997, six-month-old Shannon began having febrile convulsions, which culminated in one lasting one hour and 40 minutes.
Further down the children's ward at Walsgrave Hospital little Joshua Hill, aged 11 months, who is suffering from febrile convulsions, looked excited to get his chocolate egg.