Federalists


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Federalists

A post-Revolutionary political grouping mainly of propertied and commercial classes advocating central government (led by Hamilton).
References in periodicals archive ?
New England Federalists: Widening the Sectional Divide in Jeffersonian America.
Beveridge claims that had Marshall, who was then John Adams's secretary of state, "openly worked for Burr, or even insisted upon a permanent deadlock," the Federalists would have achieved their main purpose in denying Jefferson the presidency, and Marshall would have stayed on as Burr's secretary of state.
(24) As the Nation expanded to the South, AntiFederalist Grayson warned, [cue here for eerie music] the "ten miles square may approach us!" (25) Virginia Federalists, by way of reassurance, said that Benjamin Franklin had recommended far-off Philadelphia as the seat of government.
The critical framework for New York's 1788 debates over ratification was set by the debates over the 1783 proposal to nationalize the tax on imports, called the "impost." (3) New York vetoed the 1783 impost proposal, according to the Federalists, to preserve the tax on imports coming through the New York harbor for selfish, exclusive New York State uses.
In fairness, Madison, Hamilton, Jay, Washington, and the rest of the Federalists would be shocked by the way the Constitution they supported has been wrested and twisted, unmoored from the anchor of enumerated and limited power to which it was meant to be firmly attached.
The Federalists, who controlled the national government under our first two presidents, were centralizers with an aristocratic bent.
Thanks (paradoxically) to Marshall, the Federalists actually lost the case--Marbury never got his commission--and that may have been the main reason Marshall was not impeached.
Yet the process by which the reader becomes a participant in both the sentence and the government is through the act of deliberation, which is consistent with the role of the citizens envisioned by the Federalists. The goal of liberty and happiness Hamilton later outlines, both in this particular sentence and in the entire project of the Papers, is dependent on the action in the middle--the call to deliberate will carry the reader to the optimistic outcome.
Constitution and has long encouraged "constitution worship" by American citizens who, to this day, are influenced by the Federalists' smoke-and-mirrors campaign for ratification as though it occurred yesterday.
I met constantly during the period with federalists and separatists albeit it primarily at lower levels than those now tapped by Hebert/Lapierre.
There has been no information on the federalists' losses.