feedwater

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feedwater

(ˈfiːdˌwɔːtə)
n
(General Engineering) water, previously purified to prevent scale deposit or corrosion, that is fed to boilers for steam generation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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After evaporator is located sealing steam condenser [16] and usually two condensate and feedwater heaters (low-pressure condensate heater [17] before deaerator and high-pressure feedwater heater [18] after deaerator).
Officially founded in 1880, Patterson-Kelley quickly became a pioneer in the water heater industry with the development of innovative water heater solutions, including the feedwater heater. In the early 20th Century, P-K was a leading provider of copper-lined storage water heaters with installations in the United Nations Building, Rockefeller Center, Empire State Building and Chrysler Building.
After expansion in HPT, cold reheat steam is divided into two streams, one is sent for reheating in reheater (RH), and another is sent towards high pressure feedwater heater (HP-1).
As a result of APS' innovative approach , we were able to sleeve the Tanner's Creek feedwater heaters despite the limited access within the feedwater heater and presence of heavy wall tubing, representing a very substantial savings to AEP over replacement heaters.
Boilers or Steam Generators (SG): After passing through an additional high-pressure (HP) feedwater heater, the water enters the steam generator.
TRANTER Inc and Westinghouse Electric Company LLC have entered into a teaming agreement to develop a new modular Shell and Plate Feedwater Heater (SPFWH) for use in the power industry.
There is a feedwater heater, an economiser in the boiler, and a combustion air heater, which together with improved insulation raise boiler efficiency.
Used to be an old myth that rebuilding a feedwater heater takes longer than installing a new replacement, or that it couldn't be done with the unit in operation or on-line.