feijoa

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fei·jo·a

 (fā-zhô′ə, -jō′-, -hō′-)
n.
An evergreen shrub (Acca sellowiana syn. Feijoa sellowiana) native to South America and cultivated as an ornamental and for its sweet, tart fruit. Also called pineapple guava.

[New Latin Feijoa, former genus name, after João da Silva Feijó (1760-1824), Brazilian soldier and naturalist.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

feijoa

(fiːˈdʒəʊə)
n
1. (Botany) an evergreen myrtaceous shrub, Feijoa sellowiana, of South America
2. (Botany) the fruit of this shrub
[C19: from New Latin, named after J. da Silva Feijo, 19th-century Spanish botanist]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.feijoa - South American shrub having edible greenish plumlike fruit
pineapple guava, feijoa - dark-green kiwi-sized tropical fruit with white flesh; used chiefly for jellies and preserves
genus Feijoa - small South American shrubs or trees
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
2.feijoa - dark-green kiwi-sized tropical fruit with white flesh; used chiefly for jellies and preserves
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
feijoa, feijoa bush - South American shrub having edible greenish plumlike fruit
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
feijoa
References in periodicals archive ?
I pulled many large yellow flowers off the vines that were high in the tree to reduce the likelihood of fruit producing in my petite Feijoa tree. The flowers, which are palatable for humans, were fed to my bearded dragon, cockatoo and chickens.
Based on fruit size (measured as individual fruit weight) of each plant species, approximately 10 fruit were randomly taken from each guava and feijoa tree, and 35 fruit from each Surinam cherry and mato tree.
However, feijoa trees have shown good adaptability to subtropical regions and are also cultivated in the United States of America, New Zealand, Colombia, Australia, Turkey, and China (Thorp & Bieleski, 2002; Beyhan & Eyduran, 2011; Xiong et al., 2016).