demon

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de·mon

 (dē′mən)
n.
1. An evil supernatural being; a devil.
2. A persistently tormenting person, force, or passion: the demon of drug addiction.
3. One who is extremely zealous, skillful, or diligent: worked away like a demon; a real demon at math.
4. Variant of daimon.

[Middle English, from Late Latin daemōn, from Latin, spirit, from Greek daimōn, divine power; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

de·mon′ic (-mŏn′ĭk) adj.
de·mon′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

demon

(ˈdiːmən)
n
1. an evil spirit or devil
2. a person, habit, obsession, etc, thought of as evil, cruel, or persistently tormenting
3. Also called: daemon or daimon an attendant or ministering spirit; genius: the demon of inspiration.
4.
a. a person who is extremely skilful in, energetic at, or devoted to a given activity, esp a sport: a demon at cycling.
b. (as modifier): a demon cyclist.
5. a variant spelling of daemon1
6. informal archaic Austral and NZ a detective or policeman
7. (Computer Science) computing a part of a computer program, such as a help facility, that can run in the background behind the current task or application, and which will only begin to work when certain conditions are met or when it is specifically invoked
[C15: from Latin daemōn evil spirit, spirit, from Greek daimōn spirit, deity, fate; see daemon]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•mon

(ˈdi mən)

n.
1. an evil spirit; fiend.
2. an evil passion or influence.
3. a wicked or cruel person.
4. one with great energy: a demon for work.
5. daimon.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin daemonium < Greek daimónion, thing of divine nature (in Jewish and Christian writers, evil spirit) derivative of daímōn; (definition 6) < Latin < Greek; see daimon]

demon-

Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

demon

An evil spirit that may take many different forms. In Western tradition they are sometimes referred to as infernal spirits and have been said to exist in hundreds of thousands. In other traditions they are thought to exist in billions.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demon - an evil supernatural beingdemon - an evil supernatural being    
evil spirit - a spirit tending to cause harm
incubus - a male demon believed to lie on sleeping persons and to have sexual intercourse with sleeping women
succuba, succubus - a female demon believed to have sexual intercourse with sleeping men
dibbuk, dybbuk - (Jewish folklore) a demon that enters the body of a living person and controls that body's behavior
2.demon - a cruel wicked and inhuman persondemon - a cruel wicked and inhuman person  
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
demoniac - someone who acts as if possessed by a demon
3.demon - someone extremely diligent or skillful; "he worked like a demon to finish the job on time"; "she's a demon at math"
doer, actor, worker - a person who acts and gets things done; "he's a principal actor in this affair"; "when you want something done get a doer"; "he's a miracle worker"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

demon

noun
1. evil spirit, devil, fiend, goblin, ghoul, malignant spirit a woman possessed by evil demons
2. wizard, master, ace (informal), addict, fanatic, fiend He is a demon for discipline.
3. monster, beast, villain, rogue, barbarian, brute, ogre He was a dictator and a demon.
Related words
fear demonophobia
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
شَيْطان، عِفْريت، جِن
демон
démon
dæmon
demono
démon
djöfull, púki, illur andi
daemon
demonas
dēmonsļaunais garsnelabais
demondrac
démon
demondjävul
демон
quỷ

demon

[ˈdiːmən]
A. Ndemonio m
he's a demon for workes una fiera para el trabajo
B. ADJ
1. the demon drinkel demonio de la bebida
2. he's a demon squash-playeres un as del squash, jugando al squash es fabuloso
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

demon

[ˈdiːmən]
n
(RELIGION)démon m
(fig)démon m
modif
a demon squash player → un crack en squash
a demon driver → un fou du volant
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

demon

n (= evil spirit)Dämon m; (fig: = person) → Dämon(in) m(f); (inf: = child) → Teufel m; to work like a demonwie besessen arbeiten; he’s a demon playerer ist ein teuflisch guter Spieler (inf); the Demon DrinkKönig Alkohol m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

demon

[ˈdiːmən]
1. n (also) (fig) → demonio
he's a demon for work (fam) → è uno stacanovista
2. adj a demon squash playerun mago dello squash
a demon driver → un asso del volante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

demon

(ˈdiːmən) noun
an evil spirit; a devil. demons from Hell.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Oh, ja," said the other, "der Zweck ist nur den Feind zu schwachen, so kann man gewiss nicht den Verlust der Privat-Personen in Achtung nehmen."*
So wird der Feind auch werden auch werden gar zu Spoil und sagen selbst, dass du dass du seist unser Gott dass du seist unser Gott dass du seist unser Gott unser unser Gott.
Luther, "Der Nationalismus ein Feind unserer kirchlichen und staatlichen Ordnung," Baltische Monatsschrift 39 (1882): 122-38.
Il vero nemico, dice Freud, il "nemico serio" (der ernsthafte Feind) (Ibid., p.
(12.) LiVolsi VA, Feind CR, LoGerfo P, Tashjian AH Jr.
227-250; Hans Rose, "U 53 fahrt nach Amerika," in Werner von Langsdorff, U-Boote am Feind: 45 deutsche U-Boot-Fahrer erzahlen (Gutersloh, Ger.: Bertelsmann, 1937), pp.
(Here, one suspects, the German has the upper hand in relation to the French, who frequently accept the risks, but don't always pay the bill.) Or consider a line quoted by Sollors in German out of Schmitt's Ex Captivitate Salus: "Der Feind ist unsere eigene Frage als Gestalt" (350n.92).